Hejnum Church

Hejnum, Sweden

The Romanesque tower is the oldest part of Hejnum Church. It originally formed part of a Romanesque church, but the nave and choir were replaced during the mid-13th century by the presently visible, more Gothic parts. Remains of the original church were discovered during an excavation in 1914. A runic inscription above the western portal of the tower bears the inscription 'Botvid master mason'. The church remains largely unchanged since the Middle Ages and underwent a renovation in 1960.

The church consists of a nave, a more narrow choir, a sacristy and the western tower. The tower has openings for the church bells supported by colonnettes and an octagonal spire. Several stone reliefs, one portal and parts of a frieze from the original, Romanesque church have been incorporated into the façade of the presently visible church. The main portal of the church is unusually located on the north side of the church, since the church is located south of the road. The lancet-shaped windows, including the three slender windows in the east wall of the choir, are all original. The choir portal has decoration similar to that of Hellvi Church and has been attributed to a stonemason named Lavrans Botvidarsson. Internally, the church is decorated by frescos; one set dating from circa 1250 and another, by the so-called Master of the Passion of Christ, from the 15th century.

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Address

655, Hejnum, Sweden
See all sites in Hejnum

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Hedström (2 years ago)
Magnus KARLSSON (2 years ago)
Small to simple
Torsten Daun (2 years ago)
Ebbe Carlzon (3 years ago)
Elia Malmsten (6 years ago)
Trevligt liten kyrka med en härlig trädoft.
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