Follingbo Church

Follingbo, Sweden

The oldest parts of Follingbo Church are the nave and tower. They date from circa 1200 and together form an unusually accomplished example of Romanesque architecture on Gotland. Although lacking in ornamental sculpture, the tower and nave are well-proportioned and unusually professionally executed. The choir is later (late 13th century) and already Gothic in style, and also considered unusual for its kind. The choir replaced an earlier, Romanesque choir with an apse. The current choir instead has a straight eastern wall, adorned with a single tracery window, in which fragments of medieval stained glass panes remain. The sacristy was built in 1820-21.

Inside, the church has a painted ceiling, decorated at the end of the 17th century. Most of the furnishings are also from the 17th or 18th century. An exception is the undecorated baptismal font, which is medieval.

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Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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