The first stone church in Hörsne was built in Romanesque style during the 12th century. The oldest part of present church is the tower dating from the first half of the 13th century. The rest of the Romanesque church was eventually pulled down and replaced with a Gothic main building. Thus the choir and the vestry are from the end of the 13th century, while the nave was built during the early 14th century. When the nave was constructed, the choir was also modestly 'modernised' by the insertion of the presently visible eastern window. The church retains much of its medieval character. 

The church has two remarkably sculptured portals. The choir portal display carved foliage and a few figures: two fish and a lion. The main portal is crowned by a sculpture of Saint Michael wielding a club and carrying a shield, sitting astride the wimperg. Underneath, the capitals are profusely sculpted with scenes from the apocalypse. Other capitals are decorated with foliage ornamentation. Both of the portals may have been made by the so-called Master Egypticus, a locally active anonymous master stone sculptor, and his workshop.

Some of the church windows display original stained glass paintings, displaying architectural motifs, foliage and a depiction of Bartholomew the Apostle. The church's altarpiece is a curious mix between Gothic wooden sculptures, evidently stemming from an earlier (14th century) altarpiece, incorporated into a Baroque altar from 1701. The church also has a notable triumphal cross, where the figure of Jesus is 15th century but the cross itself from the 17th. The pews, the pulpit and baptismal font are all from the 17th and 18th centuries.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

609, Hörsne-Bara, Sweden
See all sites in Hörsne-Bara

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Linda Larsson (2 months ago)
Hernan Briones (6 months ago)
Beautiful
Magnus KARLSSON (9 months ago)
Beautiful like so many other churches on the island
Jakob Hagberg (15 months ago)
Jakob Hagberg (15 months ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Royal Palace of Olite

The Palace of the Kings of Navarre of Olite was one of the seats of the Court of the Kingdom of Navarre, since the reign of Charles III 'the Noble' until its conquest by Castile (1512). The fortification is both castle and palace, although it was built more like a courtier building to fulfill a military function.

On an ancient Roman fortification was built during the reign of Sancho VII of Navarre (13th century) and extended by his successors Theobald I and Theobald II, which the latter was is installed in the palace in 1269 and there he signed the consent letter for the wedding of Blanche of Artois with his brother Henry I of Navarre, who in turn, Henry I since 1271 used the palace as a temporary residence. This ancient area is known as the Old Palace.

Then the palace was housing the Navarrese court from the 14th until 16th centuries, Since the annexation (integration) of the kingdom of Navarre for the Crown of Castile in 1512 began the decline of the castle and therefore its practically neglect and deterioration. At that time it was an official residence for the Viceroys of Navarre.

In 1813 Navarrese guerrilla fighter Espoz y Mina during the Napoleonic French Invasion burned the palace with the aim to French could not make forts in it, which almost brought in ruin. It is since 1937 when architects José and Javier Yarnoz Larrosa began the rehabilitation (except the non-damaged church) for the castle palace, giving it back its original appearance and see today. The restoration work was completed in 1967 and was paid by the Foral Government of Navarre.