Levide Church

Levide, Sweden

Levide Church is a largely Romanesque church of a character unique for the countryside of Gotland. Parts of the choir, notably the area around the portal, is however comparable to the northern portal of Visby Cathedral in Visby, the main town of the island.

The oldest parts of the church are the aforementioned choir with its apse, dating from the late 12th century. The nave dates from the early 13th century while the tower was erected at the middle of the same century. The sacristy is the only part of the church which is not medieval.

The interior is divided into a nave and two aisles, divided by four massive pillars. The ceiling is supported by nine vaults. The interior thus forms a hall church, and the influences for the layout probably came from German churches of the time. A more direct model was probably what is today Visby Cathedral. The southern wall of the interior is decorated by frescos, probably from the middle of the 15th century and attributed to the so-called Master of the Passion of Christ. They depict apostles and saints, including the Scandinavian saints Ansgar and Bridget of Sweden. In addition, there are some purely decorative frescos, probably from the 13th century. A medieval processional cross (14th century) is also preserved in the church. Of later date is the altarpiece (1662-63) and a votive ship (1748).

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

520, Levide, Sweden
See all sites in Levide

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Uffe Berggren (10 months ago)
Jan Nilsson (18 months ago)
Old nice church
Lena Bergquist (22 months ago)
Zero Zybero (2 years ago)
Martin Eriksson (2 years ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.