Bromma Church

Stockholm, Sweden

Bromma church is a medieval so-called round church. The oldest parts of the church were built in the later 12th century as a fortress church, and the church is among Stockholm's oldest buildings. Originally the church consisted of the round house and a choir on the east side. The nave and the sacristy were constructed in the mid 15th century, built in stone. In the 1480s Albertus Pictor or his pupils painted more than forty biblical church wall paintings, which were restored from overpaints by restorations in 1905-1906. Motives of the paintings are taken from both the Old and the New Testament. On the southern wall of the round house is a crucifix dated from the 15th century.

At the end of the 17th century several changes to the church were done by Johannes Vultejus, vicar 1679-1700. The church's current roof, spire, pulpit and a wooden altar are from this period. The pulpit, dated from 1686, is a pentagon containing fields with paintings of Christ and the four evangelists. In 1703 a grave choir was constructed for the family Hjärne. The altarpiece is from 1818, surrounded by statues of Saint Peter and Paul, and the church also has some handsome epitaphs.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Unander-Scharin (12 months ago)
Beautiful church with interesting history. Unfortunately not open for visits except in conjunction with events.
kianoosh mir sattari (13 months ago)
We got meet summer ceremony, which swedish tradition, thats nice.
Jenny Isberg (14 months ago)
Church is beautiful. Mass and concerts we have been to were very good.
FG Greij (3 years ago)
One of the beautiful churches amazing
Lasse (4 years ago)
Nice old church from the 12th century. One of Stockholms three fortress churches.
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