Haderburg Castle

Salorno, Italy

Haderburg castle (Castel Salorno in Italian) dates back to Middle Ages and is located on a soaring rock spur above the homonymous village. The castle marks the lingual border of German (or bilingual) and only Italian speaking inhabitants (South Tyrol and Trentino). The building is one of the most important monuments of South Tyrol.

Castel Salorno has been constructed by the Earls of Salorno in the 13th century. Thereupon it repeatedly changed hands, first the castle was in possession of the Lords of Tyrol, in 1284 the castle was handed on to Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia. In the 14th century the House of Habsburg owned the castle complex. In 1514, under the rule of Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, the complex was enlarged and renewed. Several decades after, Castel Salorno lost its strategic significance and started to decay. Since 1648 the castle is owned by the Venetian Earls Zenobio-Albrizzi and their descendants.

Still today Castel Salorno is a really impressive complex. The current owner, baron Ernesto Rubin de Cervin Albrizzi, renovated and consolidated the castle complex by means of public funds. Since 2003 Castel Salorno has been reopened for the public and is accessible via a 890 m long steep path. Today a castle tavern with Knights’ Hall offers medieval meals and autumn dishes.

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Address

Via Trento 78, Salorno, Italy
See all sites in Salorno

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Al Falluja (21 months ago)
Da marzo a ottobre ma soprattutto in estate è una tappa obbligatoria se si vuole unire la bellezza ed il fascino del castello alla buona cucina. Speriamo che il 2019 sia all'insegna della continuità. Da visitare!
Matthijs van der Wilk (2 years ago)
Beautiful gem in the middle of the Dolomites. It gives you an amazing view of the surrounding area, but there's also a cute little bar with handmade mugs that will make you feel like you went back to the time of lords and knights!
Lucas Taddei (2 years ago)
Posto favoloso...La nuova gestione sta migliorando sotto tutti i punti di vista...complimenti! Ottimo servizio di ristoro. Semplice e curato. Per famiglie con bimbi da 3 anni in su... Suggerimenti: qualche infografica con cenni storici sarebbe molto utile.
Jennifer Illuzzi (2 years ago)
There was a live band when we went....so you are on a mountain in a medieval castle eating Tyrolean cuisine...and a sometimes bonus of a live band. Just...come on!
Christian Pallesen (4 years ago)
Nice little castle ruin with extremely good view. There's a little cafe as well.
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