St. Michael's Church

Brixen, Italy

The round parish church of Saint Michael dates from the 11th century. The Gothic choir and the bell tower were built in the 15th century while the nave is from the 16th century. The main artwork is a wooden Cireneus dates from the 15th century.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marco Passerini (2 years ago)
A fianco del più imponente duomo di Bressanone, la chiesa di San Michele è stata costruita intorno al 1500 sulle spoglie di una precedente cappella risalente al XI secolo. La sua torre svetta per oltre 70 mt. Gli interni sono stati splendidamente affrescati intorno al 1750, e sono attualmente in ottimo stato di conservazione. Vale sicuramente la pena una visita, se ci si trova sulla piazza del duomo.
Paolo Caspani (2 years ago)
La parrocchia è stata recentemente restaurata e riportata in una condizione eccellente. Gli affreschi sono tornati a nuova vita rispetto al passato quando si presentavano quasi neri e illeggibili dallo sporco e dalla fuliggine. Il restauro è durato circa due anni ma ha dato i suoi frutti.
Franz Wolf (2 years ago)
Wunderschoenes Gotteshaus tolles Adventkonzert war richtig besinnlich!!!!!
Alessandro Cugini (2 years ago)
Cuore pulsante religioso della cittadina. Messe nelle 3 lingue.
Guido Marino (2 years ago)
Bella chiesa ormai millenaria. Commistione tra gotico e barocco, come spesso capita nel Tirolo.
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