St. Michael's Church

Brixen, Italy

The round parish church of Saint Michael dates from the 11th century. The Gothic choir and the bell tower were built in the 15th century while the nave is from the 16th century. The main artwork is a wooden Cireneus dates from the 15th century.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sergio Curtolo (3 years ago)
Beautiful and very compact in size compared to the Duomo. To visit.
Lorenzo Taboni (4 years ago)
Everything is special in South Tyrol
Alexander Lirsch (4 years ago)
Beautiful newly renovated church with Gothic and Baroque style elements. In the cemetery next to it there are interesting Gothic tombs, including that of Oswald von Wolkenstein.
Gabriele Busnelli (4 years ago)
Perhaps even more beautiful than the adjacent Cathedral, more austere in its traditional South Tyrolean architecture.
Marco Passerini (5 years ago)
A fianco del più imponente duomo di Bressanone, la chiesa di San Michele è stata costruita intorno al 1500 sulle spoglie di una precedente cappella risalente al XI secolo. La sua torre svetta per oltre 70 mt. Gli interni sono stati splendidamente affrescati intorno al 1750, e sono attualmente in ottimo stato di conservazione. Vale sicuramente la pena una visita, se ci si trova sulla piazza del duomo.
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