Brixen Cathedral

Brixen, Italy

The bishop's residence has been located in Brixen since the sixth century. Between 960 and 990 AD, Brixen supplanted nearby Säben as the episcopal see, and has retained its status since that time.

Brixen Cathedral is the highest-ranking church in South Tyrol, and historically one of the most interesting. Today, the cathedral thus reflects almost all architectural styles from the Early Romanesque. The original Ottonian building took on a new Romanesque design in the twelfth century, gaining a three-aisled nave with crypt and three apses in addition to two front towers. There were more additions in the Gothic and Baroque periods.

The North Tower got its early Baroque style between 1610 and 1613. Large-scale modifications were made between 1745 and 1754. Theodor Benedetti’s high altar and the statues and frescoes by Paul Troger, Joseph Schöpf, Dominikus Molling and Michelangelo Unterperger originated from this period. Jacob Pirchstaller’s classical vestibule dates to 1783.

The cathedral is open daily.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Albuingasse 3C, Brixen, Italy
See all sites in Brixen

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

www.valleisarco.info

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

davy Sukamta (2 years ago)
Built in baroque style with a cloister attached and frescoes adorning the wall and ceiling
Thomas Ozbun (2 years ago)
Beauitful cathedral built in the Baroque style with a wonderful frescoed ceiling and an impressive pipe organ. The cloister, from the 10th century, is impressive with its well kept and interesting medieval frescoes dating from the 14th and 15th centuries.(try to spot the strange looking white elephant)
Haerin Seo (2 years ago)
Very nice fresco church in a small town.
Eynat Tauber (2 years ago)
Gorgeous and well kept, awe inspiring
Nina Trankovа (3 years ago)
I visited this place during Christmas holidays and I found the Christmas market in front very beautiful.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Augustusburg Palace

Augustusburg Palace represents one of the first examples of Rococo creations in Germany. For the Cologne elector and archbishop Clemens August of the House of Wittelsbach it was the favourite residence. In 1725 the Westphalian architect Johann Conrad Schlaun was commissioned by Clemens August to begin the construction of the palace on the ruins of a medieval moated castle.

In 1728, the Bavarian court architect François de Cuvilliés took over and made the palace into one of the most glorious residences of its time. Until its completion in 1768, numerous outstanding artists of European renown contributed to its beauty. A prime example of the calibre of artists employed here is Balthasar Neumann, who created the design for the magnificent staircase, an enchanting creation full of dynamism and elegance. The magical interplay of architecture, sculpture, painting and garden design made the Brühl Palaces a masterpiece of German Rococo.

UNESCO honoured history and present of the Rococo Palaces by inscribing Augustusburg Palace – together with Falkenlust Palace and their extensive gardens – on the World Heritage List in 1984. From 1949 onwards, Augustusburg Palace was used for representative purposes by the German Federal President and the Federal Government for many decades.

In 1728, Dominique Girard designed the palace gardens according to French models. Owing to constant renovation and care, it is today one of the most authentic examples of 18th century garden design in Europe. Next to the Baroque gardens, Peter Joseph Lenné redesigned the forested areas based on English landscaping models. Today it is a wonderful place to have a walk.