Brixen Cathedral

Brixen, Italy

The bishop's residence has been located in Brixen since the sixth century. Between 960 and 990 AD, Brixen supplanted nearby Säben as the episcopal see, and has retained its status since that time.

Brixen Cathedral is the highest-ranking church in South Tyrol, and historically one of the most interesting. Today, the cathedral thus reflects almost all architectural styles from the Early Romanesque. The original Ottonian building took on a new Romanesque design in the twelfth century, gaining a three-aisled nave with crypt and three apses in addition to two front towers. There were more additions in the Gothic and Baroque periods.

The North Tower got its early Baroque style between 1610 and 1613. Large-scale modifications were made between 1745 and 1754. Theodor Benedetti’s high altar and the statues and frescoes by Paul Troger, Joseph Schöpf, Dominikus Molling and Michelangelo Unterperger originated from this period. Jacob Pirchstaller’s classical vestibule dates to 1783.

The cathedral is open daily.

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Address

Albuingasse 3C, Brixen, Italy
See all sites in Brixen

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

www.valleisarco.info

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

davy Sukamta (2 years ago)
Built in baroque style with a cloister attached and frescoes adorning the wall and ceiling
Thomas Ozbun (2 years ago)
Beauitful cathedral built in the Baroque style with a wonderful frescoed ceiling and an impressive pipe organ. The cloister, from the 10th century, is impressive with its well kept and interesting medieval frescoes dating from the 14th and 15th centuries.(try to spot the strange looking white elephant)
Haerin Seo (2 years ago)
Very nice fresco church in a small town.
Eynat Tauber (2 years ago)
Gorgeous and well kept, awe inspiring
Nina Trankovа (3 years ago)
I visited this place during Christmas holidays and I found the Christmas market in front very beautiful.
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