Trento Cathedral

Trento, Italy

Trento Cathedral (Duomo di Trento) was built in 1212 over a pre-existing 6th-century church devoted to Saint Vigilius, patron saint of the city. Bishop Federico Wanga commissioned the architect Adamo d'Arogno to construct the new Lombard-Romanesque church. Works continued for more than a hundred years, with the Gothic style becoming increasingly evident.

The façade has a large rose window including The Wheel of Fortune. Notable also are the lions supporting the columns of the narthex on the northern side and the twisting columns in the apsidal area.

The interior has a nave and two aisles with a transept. The latter has 14th-century frescoes depicting the legend of Saint Julian and the stone statue of the Madonna degli Annegati. The apse of the right transept houses the relics of the local martyrs Sisinius, Marturius and Alexander who died around 397 AD. In the right aisle is the Crucifix Chapel (1682), with a wooden crucifix at the feet of which were promulgated the issues of the Council of Trent, whose sessions were held in the church's presbytery. Painter Ludovico Dorigny also contributed works to the cathedral.

References:
  • Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1212
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karlo Šunjo (16 months ago)
Beautiful, movie-like cathedral. Very interesting architecture.
Thomas Brenner (18 months ago)
Love this cathedral...cloose 12/12.30 - 15 ... Must do in Trento.Bthemonster
Bernard Harrison (2 years ago)
Nice. Peaceful place to visit.
Kevin Gambin (2 years ago)
Large duomo square nice cathedral
Koustabh Dolui (3 years ago)
Beautiful place to hang out on a sunny day. Buzzing square with people relaxing. Haven't been inside but a treat to the eye.
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