St. Nicholas' Church

Meran, Italy

The Church of St. Nicholas was first mentioned in 1220 and was expanded over time in the 14th century before taking its final shape in the year 1465. The architectural style is mainly Gothic.

The church consists of three naves. It has well-preserved stain glass windows, and a large rose window over a pointed arched portal, a number of wooden sculptures of saints and paintings that date from different periods. Of particular importance is the large altar and pulpit.

Outside is a tall clock tower with a sundial. Old tombstones line the walls and various paintings from the life of Jesus Christ.

Behind the church is St. Barbara's Chapel. The layout of the chapel is octagonal. It was built by the architect Hans von Burghausen in 1450, who also designed the Hospital Church. The basement served as the ossuary while the main floor was used for religious ceremonies and prayers. It features a number of wooden pews and a wooden Gothic altar, flanked by two altars from the Baroque period. Outside the entrance has a painting depicting Saint Christopher.

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Erika Pertoll said 10 days ago
I wrote a comment below but am not sure it transmitted. If not, I will try again. I was born and raised in Meran. Years ago I emigrated to the USA with my American husband.


Address

Via Portici 3, Meran, Italy
See all sites in Meran

Details

Founded: 1465
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lisetta Bortolin (3 years ago)
La chiesa di San Nicolò è un opera straordinaria d'arte antica. Da visitare soffermandosi a meditare si troverà un benessere interiore.
Marco Passerini (4 years ago)
Incerte le origini, i primi documenti la fanno risalire circa al 1220, la bella chiesa gotica a tre navate, o duomo di Merano, si trova in pieno centro storico della città, a un lato del famoso viale pedonale dei portici. Il duomo ha subito vari passaggi di costruzione, il solo campanile richiese quasi 300 anni, il portale gotico è stato realizzato nel XV secolo. E' un luogo di culto, ma anche di interesse artistico, per chi passa da questa bellissima città vale sicuramente la pena fermarsi per una visita.
John Carey (4 years ago)
Beautiful large church dedicated to patron saint of Merano. Airy and elegant. Beautiful stained glass windows and an impressive organ. Well worth a visit.
Sergio Messina (4 years ago)
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Marco Santoni (5 years ago)
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