Prince’s Castle

Meran, Italy

Sigismund, Archduke of Austria, had this modest castle (Landesfürstliche Burg) built in central location of Meran in the second half of the 15th century. He probably used this fortress behind the town hall as his private city residence. However, this ensemble of buildings rather resembles an artistically designed, solid building with low enclosure than a fully-developed castle. For this reason it is simply often referred to as “residence”.

Up to the 16th century the Prince’s Castle remained a royal residence. In 1516 also Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, resided in the castle. As the building repeatedly changed hands, it started deteriorating in the course of the centuries. In 1875 the city of Merano purchased the building. Between 1878 and 1880 a restoration period followed, based on the drawings of the internationally famous architect Friedrich von Schmidt, who also directed the renovations of the Dome of Vienna. When these renovations came to an end, the castle was opened also for the public. Today it hosts the Prince’s Castle Museum.

Its wood-panelled ancient parlours, tiled stoves, bedrooms and maiden rooms provide an interesting insight into the life in Mediaeval times. The furniture, however, dates back to the Gothic and Renaissance periods. Also some weapons such as lances and halberds have been preserved. Moreover there is a little chapel decorated with frescoes dating back to the 16th century.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.suedtirolerland.it

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gerard Farmer (3 years ago)
A fantastic place to visit. Take your time to walk through the gardens.
Fatima Rawat (3 years ago)
Fantastic place to visit. A gem!
Carmen Schubert (3 years ago)
Beautiful garden with cosy places and great views.
Angelica Morabito (3 years ago)
Deja vu
Shoreux (3 years ago)
Great place,lots of beautiful fauna. The botanical underworld themepark-ride was a blast!
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