Prince’s Castle

Meran, Italy

Sigismund, Archduke of Austria, had this modest castle (Landesfürstliche Burg) built in central location of Meran in the second half of the 15th century. He probably used this fortress behind the town hall as his private city residence. However, this ensemble of buildings rather resembles an artistically designed, solid building with low enclosure than a fully-developed castle. For this reason it is simply often referred to as “residence”.

Up to the 16th century the Prince’s Castle remained a royal residence. In 1516 also Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, resided in the castle. As the building repeatedly changed hands, it started deteriorating in the course of the centuries. In 1875 the city of Merano purchased the building. Between 1878 and 1880 a restoration period followed, based on the drawings of the internationally famous architect Friedrich von Schmidt, who also directed the renovations of the Dome of Vienna. When these renovations came to an end, the castle was opened also for the public. Today it hosts the Prince’s Castle Museum.

Its wood-panelled ancient parlours, tiled stoves, bedrooms and maiden rooms provide an interesting insight into the life in Mediaeval times. The furniture, however, dates back to the Gothic and Renaissance periods. Also some weapons such as lances and halberds have been preserved. Moreover there is a little chapel decorated with frescoes dating back to the 16th century.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.suedtirolerland.it

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Николь Уткина (30 days ago)
This place is very beautiful! I advise you to visit all 12 castles.
Malihe Jahaniyan (4 months ago)
Worth to see and it's wonderful ?
Frank Jäger (8 months ago)
Great place, one of the nicest man-made I've ever been. Don't leave Südtirol without visiting it!
Anja Svecarovski (9 months ago)
In the castle there is a museum and left thst for the end of our tour there, to chill after we took 7 hours to visit the Botanical garden, and it's worth each minute. Restaurant experience want so great as we waited 15 minutes to just be served, even though others around us were served, they forgot to bring the water we ordered, got salads without the cutlery, and when we told we didn't get the water we ordered, we were charged another one on our tab. We sorted it our later but that experience is the only bad thing we had there.
Benjamin Demetz (13 months ago)
It's a really beautiful place! It's an enormous botanical garden and it has something for everyone. It has a bamboo park for tree lovers, a picnic area for people who like to relax, it has a fish pond for fish lover, some cool looking budgies for bird lovers and even a beach for those who like to take a sunbath. It takes you about three to four hours to visit the whole garden, including the museum. There is also a restaurant and a bar for a good meal or a quick snack. There are also a lot of waterfalls with a water playground which is perfect for kids or those who don't want to walk a lot around the gardens. And for the lovers there is a special garden at the top just for you, make sure to check it out ;)
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