St. Paul's Church

Eppan, Italy

St. Pauls' Conversion Church (San Paolo) is called as 'Dome in the Countryside' as the parish church seems to have been constructed for a huge city. It is consecrated to Conversion of Paul the Apostle and located in the heart of the village. The huge bells in the 86 m high church steeple calls up for the Holy Mass with its deep tones.

In former times S. Paulo has been main village in the municipality of Appiano and numerous aristocrats have been settling down right here. As they wanted to manifest their wealth, they had this huge church constructed between 1484 and 1533 AD. The building time of the steeple lasted from the late 15th to 17th century, today it boasts Gothic and Baroque elements.

Particularly worth noticing is the sundial of 1718 and the monuments of the aristocratic families Firmian, Khuen and Thun.

References:

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Address

Paulser Platz 1, Eppan, Italy
See all sites in Eppan

Details

Founded: 1484
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

www.suedtirolerland.it

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alberto Ghiro (7 months ago)
Imposing church in the hamlet of San Paolo in the municipality of Appiano. Built in over 250 years starting around the year 1147, it has a bell tower 85 meters high. Inside there are 9 bells, the largest weighs 5 tons and is the second largest bell in South Tyrol. It was built in Innsbruck by Mr. Grassmayr and his tone is A.
Terezia Adamcova (8 months ago)
I like this region.
Johann Wagner (10 months ago)
Massive columns, a high nave, a beautiful altar, pleasant calm in our hectic times, a cool place on hot days.
Ka Pi (15 months ago)
Very worth seeing church. The tower in particular is very impressive
Siegfried Schock (15 months ago)
Very nice
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