Sigmundskron Castle

Bolzano, Italy

Sigmundskron Castle (Castel Firmiano) is an extensive castle and set of fortifications near Bolzano in South Tyrol. The first historical mention of the castle dates back to AD 945. In 1027 Emperor Conrad II transferred it to the Bishop of Trent. In the 12th century it was given to ministeriales, who from then on were named the Firmian family. Around 1473 the Prince of Tyrol, Duke Sigismund the Rich, bought the castle, renamed it Sigmundskron Castle and had it developed to withstand firearms. Of the old castle there are only a few remnants left today, mostly located on the highest point of the site. Due to financial difficulties Sigmund had to pledge the castle soon afterwards. As a result the site fell increasingly into disrepair.

At the end of the 18th century the castle belonged to the Count Wolkenstein, from 1807 to 1870 the counts of Sarnthein and from then until 1994 the counts of Toggenburg. In 1976, the half-ruined castle was partially restored by an innkeeper's family and opened as a restaurant. In 1996 the castle passed into the possession of the Province of Bolzano. In the spring of 2003, after much controversy, Reinhold Messner was given a licence for his long-planned mountain museum.

During construction work a Neolithic grave was discovered in March 2006, in which a woman's skeletal remains were found. The age of the grave is estimated to be 6,000-7,000 years.

The fortress is an important political symbol in South Tyrol. In 1957, under the leadership of Silvius Magnago, the largest protest rally in the history of South Tyrol was held here. More than 30,000 gathered in the castle to protest against the failure of the Paris Convention to protest and demand freedom for South Tyrol.

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Details

Founded: 945 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matheus van Hugten (2 years ago)
Great location and surprising collection. The resto is high quality!
Lea Bevc (2 years ago)
Extremely nice and colorful museum. Excellent exibitions and the castle is amazing. Thank you for such a nice experience. Please take all the time you need visiting this museum. I recommend it very much!
Giuditta Radeff (2 years ago)
Amazing location. Slightly expensive - but is worth it. It gives you a scent of an experience in the mountains.
Jon Fjeld Olsen (2 years ago)
A really special experience. Messner tells the story about mountaineering combined with spirituality and art and it works beautifully. The architecture is splendid with the modern iron elements nicely melted in in the ancient stone castle. A truly great experience. ...and a good culinary experience too.
Lesia N (2 years ago)
Wasn’t aware it was a museum - was just heading to a nice castle. But it appeared to be absolutely great experience. Messner Mountain Museum about mountains experience, exposing Himalayas and Tibet culture. Very relaxing atmosphere that still gives you a little adventure. Totally recommend to visit, just wear comfy shoes.
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