Thorsager Church

Rønde, Denmark

Thorsager round church is the only one of its kind in Jutland (and one of Denmark's seven medieval round churches). It was built of brick around 1200 and is one of Jutland's oldest brick buildings - perhaps the oldest. Its thick walls (1m) are an indication of the defensive role it played.

The church may lie on the site of a pre-Christian sacrificial place for the god Thor. The size of the church and its architecture suggeste that is was built by an important man - probably the king. During restoration work in 1877-78 most of the church's outer walls were replaced with new bricks. Original bricks can still be seen in the north wall of the choir. During the last restoration in 1950-52 the beautiful church interior was restored with amongst other things a new altar and pulpit. There is access to the upper floor by a staircase within the door of the church.

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Address

Kirkevej 10, Rønde, Denmark
See all sites in Rønde

Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitdjursland.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bjarne Lyngaa (2 years ago)
Meget smuk kirke ⛪ Jyllands eneste Rundkirke.
Karen Marie Kejser (2 years ago)
Smuk rundkirke.
yannis kypreos (2 years ago)
Smuk, fantastisk kirke.
Rita Westergaard (2 years ago)
Thorsager Rundkirke fremstår i dag som en smuk og rolig bygning knejsende over Thorsager by, kirken er den eneste rundkirke i Jylland og den yngste af rundkirkerne i Danmark. Da kirken blev bygget i 1200 tallet kunne man sejle ind til Thorsager, og kong Valdemar menes at have anvendt kirken, kirken kan forbindes til Slottet på Kalø ( det der idag er Kalø slotsruin. inden i har kirken gennem tiderne gennemgået flere ændringer og restaureringer, det betyder blandt andet at kalkmalerierne mangler mange steder.
Ole Hougaard (2 years ago)
Jyllands eneste rundkirke
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