Kehlburg Castle

Gais, Italy

The Kehlburg castle was built probably in 933 By the bishop Altwin of Brixen at the hillside over Gais. The most important owners later were the noble family Rost zu Aufhofen, which had the castle in possession for nearly three centuries.

After the fire in 1944 where the castle was nearly completely destroyed, the chapel of the holy Erasmus was rebuild so this was used for many years as a much visited pilgrimage. Unfortunately the castle and the chapel is damaged by vandalism.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Via Santa Caterina, Gais, Italy
See all sites in Gais

Details

Founded: 933 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.360cities.net

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lula (2 years ago)
Romantisch, schöne Wanderung, leider kein Burgbesuch möglich
Alex Dariz (2 years ago)
Wunderbarer Ort, das Schloss ist leider dem Verfall preisgegeben.
le Achim (2 years ago)
Die Burg darf nicht betreten werden und ist daher eigentlich nicht sonderlich sehenswert. Die Tür war aber offen.
Donatello Montanari (2 years ago)
Camminata medio bassa come difficoltà. Il posto sarebbe straordinario se fosse un minimo mantenuto.
Denis Chioetto (2 years ago)
Luogo abbandonato a se stesso, ed è un peccato perché sta cadendo in rovina avvolto da erbacce e nella totale incuria. Luogo ricco di fascino e mistero, con affreschi ancora visibili. Di proprietà privata, ci ai arriva dopo una bella scarpinata perché non raggiungibile dai mezzi.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.