Prince Bishops of Brixen commissioned the construction of their fortified castle (called Hofburg) in Brixen in the 13th century. The following centuries brought about numerous revisions to the structure. Around 1600 the splendid renaissance-style interior courtyard was created and decorated with bronze-overlaid terracotta statues by Hans Reichle, the celebrated sculptor from Augsburg. During that same period, the meeting rooms of the grand chancery were decorated with ample heraldic adornments.

Around 1706 Caspar Ignaz began the Baroque style renovation of the palace. It was then that the bishop’s chapel and the imperial wing with its majolica stoves were built; and the ceilings adorned with either paintings by Kaspar Waldmann and Antonio Gresta, or lavish plaster embellishments. Tapestries and the historic furnishings were added as well. In keeping with the fashions of the time, one room was converted into a Chinese cabinet.

Today Hofburg houses the diocesan collection of sacred artworks from the Romanesque period to the Modern age, the treasures of the cathedral of Brixen/Bressanone, works by 19th century Tyrolean artists, a collection of cribs and special exhibitions.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nilantha Bandara (21 months ago)
Wonderful memories. The best place to go if you are in Bressanone to view Baroque style art.
Paolo Caspani (2 years ago)
Le foto riguardano la bella collezione di 15 teche in terracotta che rappresentano l'intera vita di Gesù. Il resto del museo è altrettanto bello ed interessante. C'è una ampia sezione dedicata ai presepi tradizionali. Quest'anno alcune sale erano dedicate ad una rivisitazione del Natale sotto forma di dipinti.
Галина Г (2 years ago)
Очень понравился музей. Была в будний день, людей мало, буквально пару человек встретила. Провела в музее пол дня. Долго бродила по залам, рассматривала картины, есть просто потрясающие шедевры! Если вы приехали в Брессаноне/Бриксен, то посетите музей обязательно. Вход что-то около 10 евро. По Бриксен-кард вход бесплатный.
Stefano Corra (2 years ago)
Il Palazzo Vescovile, è un' antica residenza dei principi vescovi di Bressanone, che ad oggi ospita il Museo Diocesano con opere d’arte sacra. All' interno delle sue stanze troverete opere di artisti tirolesi, una collezione di presepi e mostre temporanee, molto interessati. Le stanze sono molto ben arredate e meritano la visita. Interessante è l' attenzione ai più piccoli. All' ingresso viene consegnato ai bimbi un foglio con delle domande sulle opere, a cui potranno rispondere visitando il complesso museale. Ci sono quiz per varie fasce di età. Alla fine del percorso verrà consegnato loro un piccolo regalo: una cartolina a scelta che riguarda il museo.
Nina Trankovа (3 years ago)
I visited the museum for Christmas. The digitized story and show of lights impressed me and made an unforgettable memory. I would recommend and visit again.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Wroclaw Town Hall

The Old Town Hall of Wrocław is one of the main landmarks of the city. The Old Town Hall's long history reflects developments that have taken place in the city since its initial construction. The town hall serves the city of Wroclaw and is used for civic and cultural events such as concerts held in its Great Hall. In addition, it houses a museum and a basement restaurant.

The town hall was developed over a period of about 250 years, from the end of 13th century to the middle of 16th century. The structure and floor plan changed over this extended period in response to the changing needs of the city. The exact date of the initial construction is not known. However, between 1299 and 1301 a single-storey structure with cellars and a tower called the consistory was built. The oldest parts of the current building, the Burghers’ Hall and the lower floors of the tower, may date to this time. In these early days the primary purpose of the building was trade rather than civic administration activities.

Between 1328 and 1333 an upper storey was added to include the Council room and the Aldermen’s room. Expansion continued during the 14th century with the addition of extra rooms, most notably the Court room. The building became a key location for the city’s commercial and administrative functions.

The 15th and 16th centuries were times of prosperity for Wroclaw as was reflected in the rapid development of the building during that period. The construction program gathered momentum, particularly from 1470 to 1510, when several rooms were added. The Burghers’ Hall was re-vaulted to take on its current shape, and the upper story began to take shape with the development of the Great Hall and the addition of the Treasury and Little Treasury.

Further innovations during the 16th century included the addition of the city’s Coat of arms (1536), and the rebuilding of the upper part of the tower (1558–59). This was the final stage of the main building program. By 1560, the major features of today’s Stray Rates were established.

The second half of the 17th century was a period of decline for the city, and this decline was reflected in the Stray Rates. Perhaps by way of compensation, efforts were made to enrich the interior decorations of the hall. In 1741, Wroclaw became a part of Prussia, and the power of the City diminished. Much of the Stray Rates was allocated to administering justice.

During the 19th century there were two major changes. The courts moved to a separate building, and the Rates became the site of the city council and supporting functions. There was also a major program of renovation because the building had been neglected and was covered with creeping vines. The town hall now has several en-Gothic features including some sculptural decoration from this period.

In the early years of the 20th century improvements continued with various repair work and the addition of the Little Bear statue in 1902. During the 1930s, the official role of the Rates was reduced and it was converted into a museum. By the end of World War II Town Hall suffered minor damage, such as aerial bomb pierced the roof (but not exploded) and some sculptural elements were lost. Restoration work began in the 1950s following a period of research, and this conservation effort continued throughout the 20th century. It included refurbishment of the clock on the east facade.