Reinegg castle was built in the mid-13th century, and is recorded in 1263 as being owned by the countess Elisabeth von Eppan. Ten years later, ownership was transferred to count Meinhard II of Tyrol. Over the centuries, fiefs were granted to a number of different families until in 1635, Reinegg castle came under the ownership of Bolzano merchant David Wagner. In 1861 the Wagner family was elevated to Counts of Sarthein; they owned Reinegg castle until 1936 when it was sold. The castle is privately owned and not open to the public.

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Founded: c. 1250
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Filippo Maria Cardano (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle, however I think it's private property.
Naila Nails (3 years ago)
Very beautifull. It rises above the valley and overlooks the village of Sarentino. Being private you cannot visit it inside, but you can get there by following a comfortable asphalted road and you can make the circular tour around it.
Thomas Heijmans (4 years ago)
Beautiful castle but such a shame it is private terrain so you can't access it. If you don't like driving don't go up there because the road is small
Paul Adams (4 years ago)
Ein schönes Wanderziel .. für die Öffentlichkeit nicht zugänglich ... aber mit schönem Ausblick.
Matthias Stofner (4 years ago)
Schön
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