Our Lady of the Rocks

Kotor, Montenegro

Our Lady of the Rocks is one of the two islets off the coast of Perast in Bay of Kotor, Montenegro. It is an artificial island created by bulwark of rocks and by sinking old and seized ships loaded with rocks. The Roman Catholic Church of Our Lady of the Rocks is the largest building on the islet; it has a museum attached. There is also a small gift shop close to the church and a navigation light at the western end of the islet.

According to legend, the islet was made over the centuries by local seamen who kept an ancient oath after finding the icon of Madonna and Child on the rock in the sea on July 22, 1452. Upon returning from each successful voyage, they laid a rock in the Bay. Over time, the islet gradually emerged from the sea. The custom of throwing rocks into the sea is alive even nowadays. Every year on the sunset of July 22, an event called fašinada in the local dialect, when local residents take their boats and throw rocks into the sea, widening the surface of the island, takes place.

The first known church was built on the islet in 1452. It was taken over by Roman Catholics and in 1632 the present Church of Our Lady of the Rocks was built. It was restored in 1722. The church contains 68 paintings by Tripo Kokolja, a famous 17th-century baroque artist from Perast. His most important painting, ten meters long, is The Death of the Virgin. There are also paintings by Italian artists, and an icon (circa 1452) of Our Lady of the Rocks, by Lovro Dobričević of Kotor. The church also houses a collection of silver votive tablets and a famous votive tapestry embroidered by Jacinta Kunić-Mijović from Perast. It took her 25 years to finish it while waiting for her darling to come from a long journey, and eventually, she became blind. She used golden and silver fibres but what makes this tapestry so famous is the fact that she also embroidered her own hair in it.

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Kotor, Montenegro
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Details

Founded: 1452
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Tickelle (2 years ago)
Just a short 5 minute boat ride from Perast (which itself is quite charming). Once on the island you can take a tour through the church, which won't take long. There isn't much to do after that, but the views of the Bay alone are worth 5 stars. There is also a souvenir shop. Part of the appeal for me was always seeing this place online, for years before ever going there. So, that made it quite iconic for me, which probably added to my enjoyment. Regardless, I can't imagine many people being disappointed with the visit. If you're already in the area you might as well go check it out.
J Ch (3 years ago)
If you’re ever In the area of Perast or Kotor Take a boat tour here! This island has a very captivating history along with a central location of the whole bay. It’s a man-made island with a chapel on it. And every year on July 22 locals throw rocks into the water attempting to expand the island as an ode to Madonna and child which was allegedly seen on a rock by sailors. How cute right? In addition this is a great place for instagram pictures! 4* because a 40 min tour is plenty.
Jakub Jílek (3 years ago)
One of the most beautiful places in
wnegrao (3 years ago)
really delicate jewel in the sea / artificial isle built during decades by sailors during their travels - one stone at time / Its a quick 1 hour must stop when traveling to Kotor in Montenegro / make sure it becomes part of your trip, you wont regret it!
Neeraj Sancheti (3 years ago)
It's a small island near Perast with an amazing view. It has a church which is pretty much like any other church except for some beautiful paintings. There are a lot of day trips by cruise or you can also take your private boat till there. Paradise for photographers!
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