Banja Monastery

Risan, Montenegro

On the way from Risan towards Perast, along the shore of the sea is located Banja monastery. The foundation of monastery is related to Stefan Nemanja who lived in the 12th century. It is thought that the monastery got its name by the Roman bathrooms, which in one of the severe earthquakes fell into the see together with the antique Risan.

At the beginning of 17th century Petar Kordic from Risan raised a church an altar on the remains of the medieval monastery and dedicated it to St. George. Stanasije Hilandarac erected the present church in 1720. In the monastery treasury of the present church there are a great number of precious items such as icons from Boka, Greece, Russia, works of various craftsmen, silver embroidery etc. an example of artistic church embroidery – stole and bracelets especially stand out. The embroidery has been made with silver and golden threads, and the faces of saints have been presented on them, while in the bottom one can see patrons. Monastery also has a great library with church books, which are mostly of Russian origin.

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Address

E65, Risan, Montenegro
See all sites in Risan

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

More Information

www.visit-montenegro.com

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ferenc Kaszas (3 years ago)
Jobb mindennél szakszerü...
Gheorghe Vasilache (3 years ago)
O locatie de neratat!
Boris Bijelović (3 years ago)
Manastir u kojem vas dočekuju kao najbliži rod. Naklon za monahinje, njihovu ljubaznost i strpljenje...
Marija Kovacevic (3 years ago)
Prelep manastir i pogled , mir i tišina
Катерина Крутых (4 years ago)
Безумно красивое место! А ещё очень гостеприимное! Детей бесплатно угостили джемом из инжира, который сами готовят. Вкус изумительный. Обязательно посетите это место.
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