Fort Gorazda was built by the Austro-Hungarian Empire near Kotor. The fortress's predecessor was built prior to the 1869 uprising. The current fort was built between 1884–86 and replaced an earlier structure; its most notable feature is a 100-ton Gruson rotating turret on its roof, the last remaining example of its type. The fort was used by the Austrians in artillery duels against Montenegrin batteries stationed on Mount Lovćen during the First World War. The Montenegrins were unable to destroy it and were pushed out of range in 1916 by an Austrian offensive. The damage to the fort was repaired and its guns were removed to support the Austrian field army. It was used as a depot by the Yugoslav Army until as recently as the early 1990s. It was subsequently abandoned and can be visited by the public.

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Address

P1, Kotor, Montenegro
See all sites in Kotor

Details

Founded: 1884-1886
Category: Castles and fortifications in Montenegro

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Petar Ćalov (4 months ago)
Perfect spot for fishing dolphins in the night sky, especially with someone you really like.
Simon Penny (5 months ago)
Fascinating building. It would be great to see this looked after so we can find out what how it was used.
Simon Hall (5 months ago)
Fantastic drive, fantastic view and interesting ruined fort.
Artur K (7 months ago)
If you are into that type of attractions you have to visit it. There ia also a great view from the roof of fortress :)
esra okay (8 months ago)
Interesting architecture , must see ☺️Also best sunset
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