Fort Gorazda was built by the Austro-Hungarian Empire near Kotor. The fortress's predecessor was built prior to the 1869 uprising. The current fort was built between 1884–86 and replaced an earlier structure; its most notable feature is a 100-ton Gruson rotating turret on its roof, the last remaining example of its type. The fort was used by the Austrians in artillery duels against Montenegrin batteries stationed on Mount Lovćen during the First World War. The Montenegrins were unable to destroy it and were pushed out of range in 1916 by an Austrian offensive. The damage to the fort was repaired and its guns were removed to support the Austrian field army. It was used as a depot by the Yugoslav Army until as recently as the early 1990s. It was subsequently abandoned and can be visited by the public.

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Address

P1, Kotor, Montenegro
See all sites in Kotor

Details

Founded: 1884-1886
Category: Castles and fortifications in Montenegro

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dave Clark (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, but very scary building, we didn't dare go all the way in!!
Vojtěch Vladyka (2 years ago)
Creepy but incredible fort without any rules.
Sarah-Jane B (2 years ago)
Fun place to explore if your not afraid of snakes and massive spiders/beetles. I'd recommend bringing a torch or using a phone torch since some rooms and corridors are dark.
Herman Kårbø (2 years ago)
Very interesting place if you are into fortifications and urban exploring, it is abandoned and open so you can explore it by yourself
Richard Llewellyn (2 years ago)
It's a really interesting place, BUT, it's very overgrown, graffiti and beer cans inside and lots of broken glass in the parking area - be careful! If you are a true explorer of abandoned buildings this place will be great and is very spooky in places - bring a torch and some good boots. If you are with a family or just curious, it probably isn't with a visit as its presentation is rustic to say the least...
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