Cetinje Monastery

Cetinje, Montenegro

The Serbian Orthodox Cetinje Monastery was founded between 1701 and 1704 by Prince-Bishop Danilo I on the site of the former court of Ivan Crnojević (founded 1485).

Cetinje was attacked by Ottomans on 25 September 1692. Instead of fighting, Venetians entered negotiations, and reached an agreement to abandon the monastery under honorable terms. However, they mined a monastery with a time bomb, which set of in the evening hours, right after Venetians retreated and as the Ottomans were victoriosly entering the monastery, killing many of them in the process.

Vladika Danilo re-established the monastery in 1701 or 1704 and added a tablet with the coat of arms of the Crnojević family, and a dedication to Ivan Crnojević. Before 1714, it was burnt, and then it was reconstructed yet again around 1743 by Metropolitan Sava Petrović Njegoš. Cetinje became again the center of spiritual, cultural and political life of the Prince-Bishopric of Montenegro.

The last time monastery was devastated was in 1785, when Mahmud Pasha Bushati sacked Cetinje. Ultimately defeated at Battle of Krusi, his decapitated head is since then kept as a relic in the monastery. It has been built on several times, the current appearance dates to 1927. The original site of the monastery, known as Ćipur was used in 1886 by Prince Nicholas of Montenegro for his Court church. The position of the newly built church follows the lineup of the original one from inside the monastery complex. Today its ruin along with couple of pillars can be seen.

There are several relics in the monastery: remains of St. Peter of Cetinje, right hand of John the Baptist, particles of the True Cross, icon of the Philermos Mother of God, royal crown of Serbian king Stephen Uroš III Dečanski, among others.

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Details

Founded: 1701-1704
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Igor Micunovic MD/Ph.D (2 years ago)
A place of mistery, spirituality and sacred orthodoxy. Must see!
Nikolin One (2 years ago)
A historic and very interesting place one can rarely see
Дубравка Угарковић (3 years ago)
Stunning. I love this beautiful Ortodox Monestery. Heavenly , that's how is owerthere. Long amazing history of Monestery and the Holly Reliquies of Sent Peters Cetinian and Sant John Baptist. I will go back again
Mateusz Kopaczyk (3 years ago)
Very important place for orthodox
Pierros Zevolis (3 years ago)
Old Serbian Orthodox monastery at the old capital of Montenegro. The hand of the Saint John the baptist exists at the monastery (photos are not allowed).
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