Château de Lussan

Lussan, France

Château de Lussan is square castle with substantial towers at each corner and was built here in the 15th century for the Lords of Audibert. There is a large clock and iron campanile on one of the towers which was added in the 19th century. The castle was in private ownership until it was seized during the Revolution: since that time the castle has had several different owners and uses and is now used for local council offices.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.francethisway.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

marie line G.T. (18 months ago)
Beau village de France
Fabienne Beer (18 months ago)
Pas aimé
Rodolphe Teyssedou (18 months ago)
Si vous cherchez le calme c'est le lieu idéal. Village propre et accueillant se visite a pied. Une vue panoramique impressionnante. Aire pour les camping car et parking avec toilette sèche
Claudine Treflest (19 months ago)
Très beau site
Keitaro Boyer (20 months ago)
Beau château ancien dans le centre de Lussan. Il y a un autre château en bas du village qui a fait office de caserne de gendarmerie pendant des années. A voir
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