Caldes Castle

Caldes, Italy

The large five-floor tower house from the 13th century was donated to the Thun family, who incorporated it into a new square building, the current Caldes Castle.

The inside is fascinating, with vaulted ceilings, wood panelling and frescoed rooms.  Quite remarkable are the count’s room and the ballroom.  After climbing the tower’s wooden staircase, you enter a room with frescoes all over the walls, telling ancient stories about the imprisonment of the unfortunate young countess Marianna Elisabetta Thun. Legend has it that the frescoes in the small room, known as Olinda’s prison, are her own work.

The Castle belongs to the Autonomous Province of Trento, that restored it and turned it into a prestigious venue for exhibitions and cultural events.

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Address

Via Novembre, Caldes, Italy
See all sites in Caldes

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.visittrentino.info

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

channel max (11 months ago)
Probably originally from the thirteenth century, it is currently in a state of ruin. Owned first by the lords of Caldes, then by the Thun, it was located in the border area between the territories of the prince bishops of Trento and the Tyrol and was repeatedly involved in episodes of war. Sold to peasants in the nineteenth century and left in disuse, it has reached our days in poor condition. It can be reached by a short, poorly marked and steeply sloping path from the village of Samoclevo. It is in ruins, not open to visitors.
Riccardo Patch1 (2 years ago)
The place is lovely. The fortress is badly kept, the road is inaccessible and there are very few indications to reach it
Jampyx Shaining (2 years ago)
Percorso impegnativo per bsmbini e anziani ma bello da vedere
Antonella Sola (3 years ago)
Christian Gallinari (3 years ago)
Bella la roccia
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