Santa Maria Maggiore Church

Trento, Italy

The Church of Santa Maria Maggiore is an important place of worship in the city of Trento, and the site of the Third Session of the Council of Trent.

Traditionally, the foundation of the church was attributed to St. Vigilius, the third Bishop of Trento, in the late fourth of early fifth century. In the Roman period, there were public buildings, including a public baths, on the site where the church was later built. The original church itself was built somewhat later than previously thought, in the late fifth or early sixth century, and had a large space divided into three naves. The chancel of this church, which was still in use towards the end of the tenth and eleventh centuries, contains traces of an opus sectile pavement dating to late antiquity, which was later replaced with a mosaic from the middle of the 6th century.

Between the late 8th and early 9th centuries a number of building works were undertaken on the cathedral, in particular the addition of richly-decorated stone liturgical fittings, including a rood screen and a ciborium. In the late 10th or early 11th centuries the old church was demolished, and its structure, including the Carolingian fittings, were used as building materials for a new church, smaller than the previous one. It had a semicircular central apse with two side-apses.

Evidence from a find of coins indicates that after 1290 a third church was built on the site of the previous one. This one had two naves ending in symmetrical apses. This building preserved, among other elements of earlier edifices, fragments of frescoes and parts of a gothic fascicule semi-pillar at one of its entrances. In 1520, work started on the current church, at the direction of Bernardo Clesio. Between 1899 and 1901 further works and restoration modified the renaissance façade.

Santa Maria Maggiore was the site of the Third Session of the Council of Trent (1545–1563).

Architecture

The main façade consists of an arched entrance in renaissance style with a door commissioned by Prince-Archbishop Cristoforo Madruzzo in 1539. Above the door is a lunette depicting the Annunciation. The bell tower, 53 metres high, is the tallest in the city. Constructed of white limestone, it has two rows of three-mullioned romanesque windows and a polygonal cupola.

The interior of the church consists of a single nave. Along the sides are a series of chapels with marble altars in the baroque style. There are also a series of altarpieces and the baroque sarcophagus containing relics attributed to Saint Clement. Of historical significance also is the series of paintings which depict sense from the Council of Trent and some of the main figures of the Counter-reformation. The choir is at the north end of the presbytery and consists of a large gallery with bas-reliefs, held up by four finely-worked corbels.

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Details

Founded: 1520
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Waas Warna (3 months ago)
Love this church
Samuel Okoyi (5 months ago)
Nice place to be, with beautiful architetural monuments
JaNNaT 79 (13 months ago)
Because I lived there place and i see it is very beautiful place
Sam Caldwell (15 months ago)
Beautiful. This historically significant church is smaller than you might think. A couple of the paintings advice the side altars are lovely, and the modern lectern and altar frontal are exceptional. Other than that, this church has a quiet, almost simple feel that belies it's historical importance as the seat of the Council of Trent
Licia Moiola (16 months ago)
This church built around 1520 us a beautiful place full of history. The second session of the COUNCIL OF TRENTO was there . Easy to find because in the center and closed to the railway station and bus station. ..
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