Villa Caldogno

Caldogno, Italy

Villa Caldogno is attributed to Andrea Palladio. It was built for the aristocratic Caldogno family on their estate in the village of Caldogno near Vicenza.

A Latin inscription on the facade dates the completion of the building to 1570 when it belonged to Angelo Caldogno. However, Angelo's father, Losco Caldogno, appears to have started to build in the 1540s, probably incorporating walls from a pre-existing building. 1570 is possibly the date of the completion of the villa's decorative scheme.

The villa is not included in I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura, Palladio's treatise of 1570, in which the architect discussed a number of his creations. However, it is similar to certain villas, such as the Villa Saraceno, that Palladio is known to have created in the 1540s and 1550s.

The villa has frescoes by Giovanni Antonio Fasolo (1530-1572), who decorated Palladio's Teatro Olimpico, and Giovanni Battista Zelotti (1526-1578), who decorated a number of villas designed by Palladio. The frescoes at Villa Caldogno Nordera have been compared to Zelotti's work at Villa Foscari.

In 1996 UNESCO included the Villa Caldogno Nordera in the World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'. The villa is in municipal ownership and is open to the public.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1570
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lara Varrone (4 months ago)
Nice experience with Veneto Segreto. Very good guide and absolutely unique villa of its kind.
Federico Romanello (4 months ago)
Venetian Villa of Palladio. With frescoes by Fasolo. Recently restored. It is absolutely worth it. The entrance staircase is enchanting and original. With the stwsso ticket of 5 euros it is also possible to visit the war bunker used today as an exhibition space. It deserves a stop.
Luca Sperandio (12 months ago)
One of the least known of the Palladian villas, but nevertheless among the most representative of villa architecture in the Venetian sixteenth century. On the outside it is imposing, but certainly not as refined as other Palladio creations. The interior, however, is truly surprising for the quality of its frescoes, which decorate the central hall and three side rooms of the building. They were made by Zelotti and Fasolo in the second half of the sixteenth century and, in the smaller room, by Giulio Carpioni in the seventeenth century. Of great help to the beauty of the decoration is the good lighting of the rooms, which enhances the colors of the paintings, all well preserved. Unfortunately short route, but the ticket price, really honest, is adequate for the four rooms that can be visited. Satisfactory visit.
marta lazzarin (2 years ago)
Great historical place outside Vicenza, definitely worth visiting!
Antonella Franchetti (3 years ago)
Io abito vicino alla villa e ci sono stata molte volte... Consiglio di visitarla, piuttosto se abiti a 20 minuti o meno dalla villa perché, è vero, il suo giardino è incantevole e sembra di essere in un sogno, ma dentro è vuota e vale la pena vederla solo per il giardino... ♯
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Palazzo Colonna

The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings built in part over ruins of an old Roman Serapeum, and has belonged to the prestigious Colonna family for over twenty generations.

The first part of the palace dates from the 13th century, and tradition holds that the building hosted Dante in his visit to Rome. The first documentary mention notes that the property hosted Cardinal Giovanni and Giacomo Colonna in the 13th century. It was also home to Cardinal Oddone Colonna before he ascended to the papacy as Martin V (1417–1431).

With his passing, the palace was sacked during feuds, and the main property passed into the hands of the Della Rovere family. It returned to the Colonna family when Marcantonio I Colonna married Lucrezia Gara Franciotti Della Rovere, the niece of pope Julius II. The Colonna"s alliance to the Habsburg power, likely protected the palace from looting during the Sack of Rome (1527).

Starting with Filippo Colonna (1578–1639) many changes have refurbished and create a unitary complex around a central garden. Architects including Girolamo Rainaldi and Paolo Marucelli labored on specific projects. Only in the 17th and 18th centuries were the main facades completed. Much of this design was completed by Antonio del Grande (including the grand gallery), and Girolamo Fontana (decoration of gallery). In the 18th century, the long low facade designed by Nicola Michetti with later additions by Paolo Posi with taller corner blocks (facing Piazza Apostoli) was constructed recalls earlier structures resembling a fortification.

The main gallery (completed 1703) and the masterful Colonna art collection was acquired after 1650 by both the cardinal Girolamo I Colonna and his nephew the Connestabile Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna and includes works by Lorenzo Monaco, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Palma the Elder, Salviati, Bronzino, Tintoretto, Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci (painting of The Beaneater), Guercino, Francesco Albani, Muziano and Guido Reni. Ceiling frescoes by Filippo Gherardi, Giovanni Coli, Sebastiano Ricci, and Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari celebrate the role of Marcantonio II Colonna in the battle of Lepanto (1571). The gallery is open to the public on Saturday mornings.

The older wing of the complex known as the Princess Isabelle"s apartments, but once housing Martin V"s library and palace, contains frescoes by Pinturicchio, Antonio Tempesta, Crescenzio Onofri, Giacinto Gimignani, and Carlo Cesi. It contains a collection of landscapes and genre scenes by painters like Gaspard Dughet, Caspar Van Wittel (Vanvitelli), and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

Along with the possessions of the Doria-Pamphilij and Pallavacini-Rospigliosi families, this is one of the largest private art collections in Rome.