Villa Caldogno

Caldogno, Italy

Villa Caldogno is attributed to Andrea Palladio. It was built for the aristocratic Caldogno family on their estate in the village of Caldogno near Vicenza.

A Latin inscription on the facade dates the completion of the building to 1570 when it belonged to Angelo Caldogno. However, Angelo's father, Losco Caldogno, appears to have started to build in the 1540s, probably incorporating walls from a pre-existing building. 1570 is possibly the date of the completion of the villa's decorative scheme.

The villa is not included in I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura, Palladio's treatise of 1570, in which the architect discussed a number of his creations. However, it is similar to certain villas, such as the Villa Saraceno, that Palladio is known to have created in the 1540s and 1550s.

The villa has frescoes by Giovanni Antonio Fasolo (1530-1572), who decorated Palladio's Teatro Olimpico, and Giovanni Battista Zelotti (1526-1578), who decorated a number of villas designed by Palladio. The frescoes at Villa Caldogno Nordera have been compared to Zelotti's work at Villa Foscari.

In 1996 UNESCO included the Villa Caldogno Nordera in the World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'. The villa is in municipal ownership and is open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1570
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

aurora Bondi (4 months ago)
Posto molto bello, peccato che con il biglietto è compreso anche la visita del bunker ma in realtà era chiuso.
M R (10 months ago)
Top villa to be visited
Erika Cecchetto (14 months ago)
Beautiful And Mysterious a presto ☺️??
fabio aba (14 months ago)
A beautiful villa, small, well kept, with an adjacent park, in an hour you can visit everything, even the nearby bunker if it is open.
Maristella Battistella (15 months ago)
From the outside it seems almost banal but inside it is frescoed .. deserves
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