Villa Caldogno

Caldogno, Italy

Villa Caldogno is attributed to Andrea Palladio. It was built for the aristocratic Caldogno family on their estate in the village of Caldogno near Vicenza.

A Latin inscription on the facade dates the completion of the building to 1570 when it belonged to Angelo Caldogno. However, Angelo's father, Losco Caldogno, appears to have started to build in the 1540s, probably incorporating walls from a pre-existing building. 1570 is possibly the date of the completion of the villa's decorative scheme.

The villa is not included in I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura, Palladio's treatise of 1570, in which the architect discussed a number of his creations. However, it is similar to certain villas, such as the Villa Saraceno, that Palladio is known to have created in the 1540s and 1550s.

The villa has frescoes by Giovanni Antonio Fasolo (1530-1572), who decorated Palladio's Teatro Olimpico, and Giovanni Battista Zelotti (1526-1578), who decorated a number of villas designed by Palladio. The frescoes at Villa Caldogno Nordera have been compared to Zelotti's work at Villa Foscari.

In 1996 UNESCO included the Villa Caldogno Nordera in the World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'. The villa is in municipal ownership and is open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1570
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonella Franchetti (9 months ago)
Io abito vicino alla villa e ci sono stata molte volte... Consiglio di visitarla, piuttosto se abiti a 20 minuti o meno dalla villa perché, è vero, il suo giardino è incantevole e sembra di essere in un sogno, ma dentro è vuota e vale la pena vederla solo per il giardino... ♯
Paolo Roccella (10 months ago)
Ottima location per cerimonie. Piacevole la visita che permette di godere degli affreschi. Discreto il parco.
Marco Binghinotto (11 months ago)
Great place and inside wonderful fresco!
Gemelli Gioia (11 months ago)
Bella vista... parco incantevole specialmente in autunno con le foglie che cadono.. bene tenuta anche la villa... opera del Palladio sempre piacevole da visitare
Susy Greggio (14 months ago)
Splendida Villa di Andrea Pietro della Gondola detto il Palladio. Da godere sia le stanze affrescate, sia la zona cantine dove sono stati resi visibili l'antico impianto idraulico. Oggi le cantine accoglievano una stimolante mostra di incisioni e opere grafiche di studenti dei licei artistici di Caldogno e del vicentino. Complimenti a tutti i giovani artisti italiani e cileni.
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