Palazzo del Capitaniato

Vicenza, Italy

The palazzo del Capitaniato was designed by Andrea Palladio in 1565 and built between 1571 and 1572. The palazzo is currently used by the town council. It was decorated by Lorenzo Rubini and, in the interior, with frescoes by Giovanni Antonio Fasolo. Since 1994 the palace has been part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'.

The Palladian loggia replaced an analogous building which had stood on the same site from the Middle Ages, and which had already been reconstructed at least twice during the Cinquecento: a covered public loggia on the ground floor and an audience hall on the upper storey. The new construction became economically viable in April 1571 and works began immediately. Palladio supplied the last drawings for the moulding templates in March 1572 and by the end of that year the building would have been roofed, since Giannantonio Fasolo could paint the lacunars of the audience hall while Lorenzo Rubini could execute the stuccoes and statues.

While the upper hall displays a flat, coffered ceiling, the ground-floor loggia has a sophisticated vault covering, certainly to better sustain the weight of the hall. The overall design is extremely sophisticated, as witnessed for example by the portals which open within the niches and follow their curvature.

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Details

Founded: 1571-1572
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alessandro Zorzi (20 months ago)
Il palazzo del Capitaniato, noto anche come loggia del Capitaniato o loggia Bernarda, è un palazzo di Andrea Palladio che si affaccia sulla centrale Piazza dei Signori a Vicenza, di fronte alla Basilica Palladiana, attualmente sede del consiglio comunale cittadino. Fu decorato da Lorenzo Rubini, e all'interno i dipinti sono di Giovanni Antonio Fasolo. Il palazzo fu progettato nel 1565 e costruito dal 1571 al 1572. Dal 1994 è, con le altre architetture di Palladio a Vicenza, nella lista dei patrimoni dell'umanità dell'UNESCO. Nella catalogazione dei beni culturali, in Italia, questo palazzo è un'opera d'arte che viene catalogata nei tipi di beni immobili, architettura di tipo A.
D S (2 years ago)
Must see in Vicenza
Zoltán Varga (3 years ago)
Fascinating!
Dario Rodighiero (4 years ago)
Another masterpiece of Palladio
Marco Simonetto (4 years ago)
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