The Villa Pisani is a patrician villa designed by Andrea Palladio, located in Bagnolo, a hamlet in the comune of Lonigo.

The Pisani were a rich family of Venetian nobles who owned several Villas Pisani, two of them designed by Andrea Palladio. The villa at Bagnolo was built in the 1540s and represents Palladio's first villa designed for a patrician family of Venice (his earlier villa commissions were from provincial nobility in the Vicenza area). It was designed with rusticated features to complement its rural setting; in contrast, the Villa Pisani at Montagnana in a semi-urban setting utilizes more refined motifs.

In 1570 Palladio published a version of the villa in his Four Books of Architecture. The executed villa differs noticeably from the design. The deviations may have been in response to certain conditions on the actual site.

An engraved ground plan of 1778 by Ottavio Bertotti Scamozzi, gives a clear idea of the villa as it appeared in the 18th century. There was originally a long barchessa (wing) at the back of the courtyard terminating in dovecotes that kept the villa supplied with squab; this wing was admired by Vasari, but it was demolished in the nineteenth century and replaced by a structure that bears no relation to the Palladian facade it faces.

The interior features a central T-shaped salone with barrel vaulting inspired by Roman baths; it is decorated with frescoes.

In 1996, UNESCO included the villa in the World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'.

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Address

SP500 81, Lonigo, Italy
See all sites in Lonigo

Details

Founded: 1540s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Celestino CHABI (16 months ago)
That's a really beautiful Villa, which not only has some rental rooms, but also a magnificent restaurant. The food is really good, delicious, the service is: Top. Thé garde is really beautiful
Frederik De Waele (2 years ago)
Amazing hotel and top quality restaurant!
Frederik De Waele (2 years ago)
Amazing hotel and top quality restaurant!
Stefano Belcaro (3 years ago)
Great
Stefano Belcaro (3 years ago)
Great
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