Villa Cornaro was designed by the Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio in 1552 and is illustrated and described by him in Book Two of his 1570 masterwork, I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura.

Villa Cornaro was mainly constructed in 1553-1554, with additional work into the 1590s, after Palladio had died, for Giorgio Cornaro, younger son of a wealthy family. It represents one of the most exemplary examples of a Renaissance villa during this time frame. The north façade has an innovative projecting central portico-loggia that is a flexible living space out of the sun and open to cooling breezes.

The interior space is a harmonious arrangement of the strictly symmetrical floor plans on which Palladio insisted without exception. Rooms of inter-related proportions composed of squares and rectangles flank a central axial vista which extends through the house. As Rudolph Wittkower noted, by moving subsidiary staircases into the projecting wings and filling matching corner spaces with paired oval principal stairs, space was left for a central salone which is fully as wide as the porticos. The central core of the villa forms a rectangle in which there are six repetitions of an elegant standard module. The interior has 18th-century frescos by Mattia Bortoloni and stuccos by Camillo Mariani.

Through its illustration in Palladio's I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura, in the 18th century Villa Cornaro became a model for villas all over the world.

The villa is owned by Carl and Sally Gable, of Atlanta, Georgia. Since 1996 the villa has been conserved as part of a World Heritage Site, 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'.

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Details

Founded: 1552-1554
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Luca Barban (17 months ago)
Tra i massimi risultati dell'architettura civile palladiana, patrimonio Unesco e archetipo della White House di Washington, villa Cornaro rappresenta uno dei punti più alti della civiltà di ville venete.
Lucio Calzamatta (17 months ago)
Bellissima villa nelle colline di maser
G B (2 years ago)
Un'architettura perfetta, con una sapiente scelta tipica del Palladio. Consiglio a chiunque si trovi in zona di visitarla..ne vale la pena.
Luigi MDC (2 years ago)
One of the best architecture masterpieces in the World, by Palladio and World heritage site.
Paolo Argenziano (2 years ago)
Bellissima villa progettata dal Palladio nel 1552. Interessante la spiegazione storica della guida. Merita certamente una visita per chi si trovasse a passare in zona.
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