Villa Cornaro was designed by the Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio in 1552 and is illustrated and described by him in Book Two of his 1570 masterwork, I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura.

Villa Cornaro was mainly constructed in 1553-1554, with additional work into the 1590s, after Palladio had died, for Giorgio Cornaro, younger son of a wealthy family. It represents one of the most exemplary examples of a Renaissance villa during this time frame. The north façade has an innovative projecting central portico-loggia that is a flexible living space out of the sun and open to cooling breezes.

The interior space is a harmonious arrangement of the strictly symmetrical floor plans on which Palladio insisted without exception. Rooms of inter-related proportions composed of squares and rectangles flank a central axial vista which extends through the house. As Rudolph Wittkower noted, by moving subsidiary staircases into the projecting wings and filling matching corner spaces with paired oval principal stairs, space was left for a central salone which is fully as wide as the porticos. The central core of the villa forms a rectangle in which there are six repetitions of an elegant standard module. The interior has 18th-century frescos by Mattia Bortoloni and stuccos by Camillo Mariani.

Through its illustration in Palladio's I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura, in the 18th century Villa Cornaro became a model for villas all over the world.

The villa is owned by Carl and Sally Gable, of Atlanta, Georgia. Since 1996 the villa has been conserved as part of a World Heritage Site, 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'.

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Founded: 1552-1554
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

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User Reviews

Alberto Levorato (7 months ago)
Gorgeous
Antonio Pistore (20 months ago)
Superb villa of Palladio characterized by two facades, both with a two-story porch. The interior is very beautiful and harmonious. I attach photos from 1980
Gastone Tiengo (2 years ago)
Very. Carina visit it. With. N a, altrs cke is not. The wife.
Geralda Luciana Lopes (2 years ago)
Parece que está vivendo outro século passado!
Luca Barban (2 years ago)
Tra i massimi risultati dell'architettura civile palladiana, patrimonio Unesco e archetipo della White House di Washington, villa Cornaro rappresenta uno dei punti più alti della civiltà di ville venete.
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