Villa Porto was designed in 1554 and traditionally attributed to the Italian architect Andrea Palladio, but not included by UNESCO in the strict list of Palladian Villas of Veneto

In 1554, Paolo Porto and his brothers divided up their father’s inheritance, Paolo acquiring an estate at Vivaro, north of Vicenza. Here, during the subsequent four years, he realised a villa which tradition holds was designed by Palladio. The Conte Paolo Porto, one of the most powerful canons of the Cathedral (in 1550 he was on the point of becoming bishop) was a sophisticated and cultured man, who passed much time in Rome where he could count on the friendship of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese. Porto also numbered among his Vicentine friends and relatives Palladio’s foremost patrons, men like Giangiorgio Trissino, Biagio Saraceno, Bernardo Schio, and Girolamo Garzadori.

It is perhaps this network of friendships which most easily placed him in contact with Palladio, although in this regard careful inspection of the villa’s architecture raises more doubts than certainties. For one discerns various successive constructional phases, which render the identification of an original Palladian scheme, if any, most difficult. The pronaos, for example, is grafted onto the main block with manifest discontinuity. Moreover, the two lateral wings are without doubt nineteenth-century, and actually the product of a belated “Palladianization” of the villa at the hands of the architect Antonio Caregaro Negrin.

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Founded: 1554
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

DARIO BERNARDOTTO (3 years ago)
Atmosfera di una volta. Bella location per cerimonie ed eventi.
Adtiano Cancellari (3 years ago)
Bella villa in stile neoclassico palladiano. Ottimo per matrimoni
Annalisa (3 years ago)
Molto bella e caratterizzante del territorio. Curata molto bene dai proprietari.
Luciano Zangirolami (3 years ago)
Sono andato per dei lavori Ho chiamato all’ultimo momento senza nessun problema mi anno aperto Ringrazio per la cortesia Bellissimo
francesco scanagatta (5 years ago)
Il veneto ha un grande patrimonio di ville. Il grande architetto Andrea Palladio ha creato uno stile che ha influenzato la realizzazione di moltissime ville. Questa è una villa veramente bella, è bello arrivare alla villa dalla strada che la raggiunge frontalmente.
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