Villa Porto was designed in 1554 and traditionally attributed to the Italian architect Andrea Palladio, but not included by UNESCO in the strict list of Palladian Villas of Veneto

In 1554, Paolo Porto and his brothers divided up their father’s inheritance, Paolo acquiring an estate at Vivaro, north of Vicenza. Here, during the subsequent four years, he realised a villa which tradition holds was designed by Palladio. The Conte Paolo Porto, one of the most powerful canons of the Cathedral (in 1550 he was on the point of becoming bishop) was a sophisticated and cultured man, who passed much time in Rome where he could count on the friendship of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese. Porto also numbered among his Vicentine friends and relatives Palladio’s foremost patrons, men like Giangiorgio Trissino, Biagio Saraceno, Bernardo Schio, and Girolamo Garzadori.

It is perhaps this network of friendships which most easily placed him in contact with Palladio, although in this regard careful inspection of the villa’s architecture raises more doubts than certainties. For one discerns various successive constructional phases, which render the identification of an original Palladian scheme, if any, most difficult. The pronaos, for example, is grafted onto the main block with manifest discontinuity. Moreover, the two lateral wings are without doubt nineteenth-century, and actually the product of a belated “Palladianization” of the villa at the hands of the architect Antonio Caregaro Negrin.

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Founded: 1554
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Aurelio Bonato (12 months ago)
The villa is beautiful externally, unfortunately I have not had the opportunity to enter and I'm sorry. If the interior is as well as the exterior, it would be wonderful to visit it, I don't know if possible because it is a private residence. The owner should be heard.
Stefano Mingardo (14 months ago)
Beautiful villa, beautiful garden
Dario Dalmasso (14 months ago)
Ideal place to celebrate the wedding, kind and helpful owners. I recommend it
Alessandro Pastò (14 months ago)
Nice villa nice place for weddings and more.
Bababalloon Nicole Fanton (2 years ago)
I went to work on Saturday at this lovely villa, I congratulate the owner for her kindness, availability and collaboration, she knew how to put everyone at ease, guests and service personnel. Location clean and well maintained. I recommend it.
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