Teatro Sociale

Como, Italy

Teatro Sociale was inaugurated in 1813, when Giuseppe Verdi was born. Since its beginning, Teatro Sociale has been a center of attention that attracts the most important musicians and opera singers. In 1899, 100 years after the invention of Volta's electric battery, Teatro Sociale was provided with electric light. In 1943 it hosted Teatro alla Scala that was not habitable because of World War II bombing. Nowadays, Teatro Sociale is open 300 days a year with theater, opera, concerts and dance exhibitions. 

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    Founded: 1813
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    Rating

    4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Christos Aravidis (3 months ago)
    Fine restaurant in a perfect location. Really tasty Italian food with fresh delicious ingredients. Friendly staff. Highly recommended.
    Benjamín Hernández-Rodríguez (10 months ago)
    Excellent performance and elaborate interior.
    Brian Mayers (11 months ago)
    Event with a presentation on artificial intelligence 12-18-19
    John Kerr (12 months ago)
    Memorable and great location for my 2nd visit to the annual Vacation Rental World Summit.
    Dragan Ivancevic (12 months ago)
    Stunning venue. Visit highly recommended.
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