Como Cathedral

Como, Italy

Como Cathedral is one of the most important buildings in the region. It is commonly described as the last Gothic cathedral built in Italy: construction on it, on the site of the earlier Romanesque cathedral dedicated to Santa Maria Maggiore, began in 1396, 10 years after the foundation of Milan Cathedral. The construction works, started under the supervision of Lorenzo degli Spazzi di Laino, did not finish until 1770 with the completion of the Rococo cupola by Filippo Juvarra. The imposing west front was built between 1457 and 1498 and features a rose window and a portal between two statues of Pliny the Elder and Pliny the Younger, natives of Como.

It is 87 metres long, from 36 to 56 metres wide, and 75 metres high into the top of the cupola. It has a Latin Cross floor plan with a central nave and two side aisles, separated by pillars, and a Renaissance transept, with an imposing cupola over the crossing. The apses and the choir are of the 16th century. The interior has some important tapestries, and others of the 16th and 17th centuries, made in Ferrara, Florence and Antwerp. There are also a number of 16th-century paintings by Bernardino Luini and Gaudenzio Ferrari.

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Details

Founded: 1396
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Zaki (2 years ago)
Como lake is amazing. But don't forget to visit is wonderful Cathedral. Then go to enjoy lake
Raymond Dimech (2 years ago)
A typical Italian cathedral with all its grandiosity and beautiful works of art. Close to the castle and other central attractions in this medieval city. You can enjoy the re-enactments and procession in the evening at the main square.
Mariah Buck (2 years ago)
Magnificant structure. The illustrative boards depicting the timeline for construction of the church are well worth taking the time to read.
Catherine (2 years ago)
Beautiful basilica. On the day we went (last day in December) they had a life size crib inside the cathedral. There are also large tapestries hanging all along the aisles. Outside is just as interesting as they project lights on the walls of all the buildings around the church. Magical.
Mithu Sen (3 years ago)
Magic in the air! Wonderful experience both inside and outside the Cathedral. In this period, the area turned into a magical fable. Do not miss it. Parking is a huge problem. Recommend that you park in an official car park and pay for enough hours. Time flies. Enjoy the magic of Christmas and the cold. Must not miss!
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