Villa Carlotta

Tremezzo, Italy

The beautiful Villa Carlotta was built at the end of 17th century by the Milanese marquis Giorgio Clerici in a natural basin between lake and mountains, facing the dolomite Grignas and the peninsula of Bellagio. The architect created for the Clericis an important but sober building, with an Italian garden decorated with sculptures, stairs and fountains. 

In 1801 Gian Battista Sommariva, famous politician, businessman and patron of arts, bought the villa. Thanks to this owner the property in Tremezzo attained the summit of its splendour and became one of the most important halting-place of the Grand Tour. The villa became a temple of 19th century art with works of Canova, Thorvaldsen and Hayez: Palamedes, Eros and Psyche, Terpsychore, The last kiss of Romeo and Juliet are only some of the masterpieces that enriches the extraordinary collection.

Under Sommariva part of the park was transformed in a fascinating romantic garden. Sommariva's heirs sold the villa in 1843 to Princess Marianne of Nassau, Albert's of Prussia wife, who gave it as a present to her daughter Carlotta in occasion of her wedding with Georg II of Saxen-Meiningen. Hence the name Villa Carlotta. Very fond in botanic, Georg enriched the park, today of great historical and environmental value. The gardens of Villa Carlotta chiefly owe their reputation to the rhododendrons' and azaleas' spring flowering, consisting of over 150 different sorts. 

But the gardens are worth to visit in every period of the year: old varieties of camellias, century old cedars and sequoias, huge planes and tropical plants, the Rock garden and the Ferns valley, the Rhododendrons wood and the Bamboos garden, the agricultural tools museum and the wonderful views on the lake built in the ages the celebrity of this place, still today consider 'a place of heaven'.

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Details

Founded: 1695
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

michael strama (12 months ago)
Beautiful grounds, give yourself 45-90 minutes to see it properly.
Joao Pereira (13 months ago)
A must visit if you are in the Lake Como area. Stunning garden with a variety of trees and plants from around the world.
Rhonda Lapadot (13 months ago)
If you like gardens, you're going to LOVE this place. Try to go in the Spring when many of the flowers are in bloom.
Mithu Sen (15 months ago)
Charming garden known for its azalea and rhododendron on the lake Como. Do not miss the villa that houses several Canova pieces. Recommend that you take the ferry service rather than driving as parking spots are limited near the Villa. You need 3-4 hours for a full unhurried visit. Best time to visit the park is in the mornings. Recommend the late Spring season, when the flowers are in full bloom.
Jacqui Lockley (2 years ago)
Beautiful villa, can visit quite quickly though. Grounds alone are worth a visit. Went in October, imagine spring would be lovelier still. Cafe really good. Lovely salads had, very wide range of meals and snacks.
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