Fort Montecchio-Lusardi

Colico, Italy

Fort Montecchio-Lusardi is a military fort situated in Colico, built between 1911 and 1914. It is the only Italian fort from World War I which has been preserved intact with its original weapons. The main function of the fort was to control the roads of Spluga, Maloja and Stelvio, in case the Central Powers decided to invade northern Italy, violating the neutrality of Switzerland.

The fort was one of the strongholds in a complex barrier system which extended up to Monte Legnone, though it remained inactive throughout the World War. During the World War II the fort also never entered a major action: the only gunshots were fired after the fort was occupied by the partisans, at a German column that marched along the opposite bank of the lake. The fort was later used as a weapons depot and eventually transferred to the state property.

Attractions in fort are four French 149 mm guns, with a range of 14 km, each rotating inside a cast-iron dome. The fort is divided into two parts: the lower area contains housing and powder magazines and the upper part contains guns. The two areas are linked by a curved gallery.

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Details

Founded: 1911-1914
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dj Tra (15 months ago)
It's all right. Nothing to write home about. If you have relatives living inside the fortress and you're going to visit the, then by all means take a look at it. The Tour guid(ess) was excellent and fluently made the tour bilingual in IT/EN. Spoiler: in the end Mussolini dies. So one more star for the fort, that was indirectly resposible for it. At least according to the relatives, that live inside the fortress.
Patrik Bichsel (21 months ago)
Very interesting. We went with our kids (5, 3, 1)and the guide paused to let us translate.
Philip Batty (2 years ago)
Very quirky, never seen anything like it before.
Merlo Limet (2 years ago)
It was great experience hear and see these place.it is military installation during WW1
Janine Powell (2 years ago)
Very interesting place with a lot of history. 2 charming ladies look after you with 1 a special guide who explains everything in English.
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