Basilica di San Fedele

Como, Italy

The Basilica of San Fedele in Como is located in the city center and is dedicated to Saint Fidelis martyr. It derives from an earlier Christian church, dating from the seventh century, dedicated to Euphemia.

The present church dates from 1120, the building is Romanesque and not just the original three naves irregular grafted onto a central plant, also irregular due to the smaller size compared to the two main apse of the transept. In the back there is a barrel vault in the nave with bone-arched pediment. The restoration of Antonio Giussani altered the facade (1914) and bell tower (1905). Farm use of Roman pieces are carved above the door back in Romanesque capitals and adapted to ambulatory font north of lion terrier.

The interior has three naves and three apses presbytery, covered by a dome and surrounded by an ambulatory. Along the ambulatory, there are medieval votive frescoes.

In the chapel of the Crucifix, there is an impressive marble altar contains the crucifix in papier-mâché painted on the apse by Isidoro Bianchi in 1623.

At the end of the north aisle, there is the chapel of the Blessed Virgin Purified represented by a seventeenth-century statue in gilded wood. The bowl is painted with frescoes of the Assumption of the Virgin attributed to the painter Domenico Caresana and Francesco Carpano. At the sides of the altarpiece there are four seventeenth-century frescoes of the Marriage of the Virgin, the Nativity, the Annunciation to the Shepherds and the Adoration of the Magi.

The first chapel on the right has different characteristics from the others. The ceiling is lined with baroque stucco, and on the wall there is a triptych painted in 1504 by Giovanni Andrea De Magistris representing Mary with Child between Saints Sebastian and Rocco; below there is an urn which contained the remains of sant'Amanzio bishop of Como.

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Details

Founded: 1120
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fabio Fruschera (9 months ago)
Wonderful.
Danny Boudrot (10 months ago)
Beautiful!
alessandro amici (16 months ago)
Beautiful church in the heart of Como
Joshua Obiabo Ehoche (18 months ago)
Beautiful arena of church art. Great street performers.
Klaudijus Vitkauskas (2 years ago)
Very nice place with cool street performers outside
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