Stenico Castle

Stenico, Italy

A seat of power built on a spur overlooking the roads of communication towards the Valli Giudicarie, Stenico Castle dates back to more than 2000 years. It was first built as a refuge for the Stoni - a proud Alpine population exterminated by the Romans - from which the town takes its name.

The castle history is closely tied to the Prince-Bishops of Trento, who also used to administer justice. Legend has it that prisoners were left to die of starvation in the hunger tower, and that their restless spirits still appear on full-moon nights.

In the 18th century, the castle saw the beginning of its decadence with the Napoleonic occupation. The first refurbishing works began in 1910 and were later continued in 1973 by the Autonomous Province of Trento.

Visitors can access the castle on a steep ramp connecting the piazza to the town of Stenico. The frescoes housed in the main rooms are of particular interest. Nowadays the castle is an important venue and hosts exhibitions, photographic and contemporary art contests as well as concerts and other performances. Furthermore, it also hosts a prized archaeological section dedicated to local history as well as a furniture, paintings, arms and ancient tools exhibition borrowed from the collections of the Museum of the Castello del Buonconsiglio in Trento, of which it is a branch.

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Address

Pianata 1, Stenico, Italy
See all sites in Stenico

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bob Francis Jeanne Ekstrom (2 years ago)
Interesting
Mauro Bellati (2 years ago)
Small but interesting castle. It contains several rooms with paintings, original interiors and furnitures, many original objects (keys, coffers, bells, clocks, armors, guns and army) all with explanations and useful info. The staff is friendly and they explained additional things about the surrounding area. Overall I am very satisfied.
Rade Stojakovic (2 years ago)
Beautiful and well maintained castle with lots of interesting informations about past times. Every first Sunday in month entrance is free.
Fritz Wiemann (2 years ago)
Top
Petr Chudoba (2 years ago)
A nice place with spirit.
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