Thun Castle

Ton, Italy

The monumental Thun Castle was built in the mid-13th century, but the current appearance dates mainly from the 16th and 17th centuries. The Spanish style gate built in 1566 in Moorish style, probably after Giorgio Thun was visited in Spain. The most famous room is the seventeenth-century Bishop's Room, entirely covered of pine wood, with a coffered ceiling and a tiled stove.

Today Thun castle is open to the public.

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Address

Via Doss, Ton, Italy
See all sites in Ton

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.buonconsiglio.it

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karen Wells (3 years ago)
One of the most beautiful castles I've seem. We ride our bikes there viewed the castle and the beautiful art pieces all the while wondering what it would have been like to live there.
John Pasini (3 years ago)
Many interesting furnished rooms to visit. Well organized. Worth viewing how some of the surrounding walls were built.
Doee deeer (3 years ago)
Must see, stunning castle adapted as a renaissance residence, one of a kind
Alfredo Pascual (3 years ago)
Pretty cool castle and fair ticket prices. It seems to be very popular among Italians. I was there a Sunday and there were lots of people despite being Covid-19 times (hygiene rules and distancing was largely respected).
Angela Bova (3 years ago)
The place is amazingly presented and it has original furniture (form other residences that belonged to the family) and appliances. The garden is beautiful and well maintened, there is a little café there - highly recommended!
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