Thun Castle

Ton, Italy

The monumental Thun Castle was built in the mid-13th century, but the current appearance dates mainly from the 16th and 17th centuries. The Spanish style gate built in 1566 in Moorish style, probably after Giorgio Thun was visited in Spain. The most famous room is the seventeenth-century Bishop's Room, entirely covered of pine wood, with a coffered ceiling and a tiled stove.

Today Thun castle is open to the public.

Comments

Your name



Address

Via Doss, Ton, Italy
See all sites in Ton

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.buonconsiglio.it

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karen Wells (7 months ago)
One of the most beautiful castles I've seem. We ride our bikes there viewed the castle and the beautiful art pieces all the while wondering what it would have been like to live there.
John Pasini (7 months ago)
Many interesting furnished rooms to visit. Well organized. Worth viewing how some of the surrounding walls were built.
Doee deeer (8 months ago)
Must see, stunning castle adapted as a renaissance residence, one of a kind
Alfredo Pascual (8 months ago)
Pretty cool castle and fair ticket prices. It seems to be very popular among Italians. I was there a Sunday and there were lots of people despite being Covid-19 times (hygiene rules and distancing was largely respected).
Angela Bova (8 months ago)
The place is amazingly presented and it has original furniture (form other residences that belonged to the family) and appliances. The garden is beautiful and well maintened, there is a little café there - highly recommended!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Trepucó Talayotic Settlement

The settlement of Trepucó is one of the largest on Menorca, covering an area of around 49,240 square metres. Today, only a small part of the site can still be seen, the two oldest buildings, the talaiots (1000-700 BCE). Other remains include parts of the wall, two square towers on the west wall, the taula enclosure and traces of dwellings from the post-Talayotic period (650-123 BCE).The taula enclosure is one of the biggest on the island, despite having been subjected to what, by today’s standards, would be considered clumsy restoration work. This is one of the sites excavated around 1930 by Margaret Murray, a British archaeologist who was a pioneer of scientific research on Prehistoric Menorca.

The houses are perfectly visible on the west side of the settlement, due to excavation work carried out several years ago. They are multi-lobed with a central patio area and several rooms arranged around the outside. Looking at the settlement, it is easy to see that there was a clear division between the communal area (between the large talaiot and the taula) and the domestic area.The houses near the smaller talaiot seem to have been abandoned at short notice, meaning that the archaeological dig uncovered exceptionally well-preserved domestic implements, now on display in the Museum of Menorca.The larger talayot and the taula stand at the centre of a star-shaped fortification built during the 18th century.