Villehardouin's Castle

Mystras, Greece

Mystras, the ‘wonder of the Morea’, developed down the hillside from the fortress built in 1249 by the prince of Achaia, William II of Villehardouin, at the top of a 620 m high hill overlooking Sparta.

The Principality of Achaea was one of the three vassal states of the Latin Empire which replaced the Byzantine Empire after the capture of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade. It became a vassal of the Kingdom of Thessalonica, along with the Duchy of Athens, until Thessalonica was captured by Theodore, the despot of Epirus, in 1224. After this, Achaea became for a while the dominant power in Greece.

The Franks surrendered the castle to the Byzantines in 1262, it was the centre of Byzantine power in southern Greece, first as the base of the military governor and from 1348 as the seat of the Despotate of Morea. Captured by the Turks in 1460, it was occupied thereafter by them and the Venetians.

Today impressive ruins of Villehardouin's Castle still remain.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Mystras, Greece
See all sites in Mystras

Details

Founded: 1249
Category: Castles and fortifications in Greece

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

BARTOSZ R (2 years ago)
Amazing views. Worth climbing up there.
Libusha Steele (2 years ago)
Great archaeological historical place to visit. You'll need about 3 hours
Pandora SEON (2 years ago)
A kinda hiking walk to visit the old city of Mystras. Anyway the beauty and the wealth of the place make you cross centuries of history.
George Giannisis (2 years ago)
Fantastic view of Mystras from the castle
G Gianni (G. G.) (2 years ago)
Fantastic view of Mystras from the castle
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