Mörbylånga Church

Mörbylånga, Sweden

The oldest parts of Mörbylånga Church were built in the 13th century. For instance the decorations over the west tower portal have been dated to this period. The church was enlarged and reconstructed in the beginning of 19th century according the design of Johan Petterson. The medieval tower was restored in 1872.

The church possesses a triumphal crucifix, which would have been used in procession during medieval times, from the same period. The porch contains a tombstone from the fourteenth century. The pulpit, by Anders Dahlstrom, was carved in 1747.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

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