Villa Manin at Passariano was the residence of the last Doge of Venice, Ludovico Manin. Napoleon Bonaparte and Josephine de Beauharnais lived there for about two months in 1797. Here were conducted many interviews for the signing of the treaty between France and Austria known as the Treaty of Campoformio (17 October 1797).

Villa Manin is a monumental architectural complex built in the 16th century at the behest of the noble Friulian Antonio Manin who, at the loss of the dominion of the seas, focused on the resources offered by the mainland, setting up a farm and putting a manor house at his center. The first factory of the villa is dated between 1650 and 1660.

In the following years, the grandchildren Ludovico Manin I and Francesco IV took up the project, perhaps aided by the architect Giuseppe Benone. The original appearance of the 17th-century villa was radically different from the current one, due to the transformations and enlargements in 18th century by Ludovico II and Ludovico III, made first by the Venetian architect Domenico Rossi, and then by Giovanni Ziborghi, who between 1730 and 1740 did raise the barchesse (barn wings). The raising of the noble central core, built with the consulting of Giorgio Massari, was realized after 1745. The large garden (over 17 acres) in the back appears to be due to the will of the 'master of the house' Ziborghi.

Substantial interventions of 19th century, especially by Giannantonio Selva, modified the original garden, giving us today a place complicated by the alterations and replacements of the same tree species.

Chapel of Sant'Andrea

To the villa complex also belongs the chapel of Sant'Andrea, built 1708 by Domenico Rossi and located outside the square plaza adjoining the barchessa and to the east gate. The building is square with rounded corners. The façade, with gable and two pairs of columns at sides is adorned on the edge of the pediment with statues and marble groups by Pietro Baratta. Inside, in the sacristy, there are two marble altars by Giuseppe Bernardi-Torretti, and in the hall two other marble altars with altarpiece worked in relief by the same Torretti.

Decoration

As well as a fine piece of architecture, the villa is also important for the 18th-century artworks. The villa is decorated with frescoes by Ludovico Dorigny, Jacopo Amigoni and Pietro Oretti, paintings by Francesco Fontebasso and sculptures by Torretti.

Collections and exhibitions

Villa Manin also contains a museum area of considerable interest for the tourist. The permanent exhibitions are a collection of antique carriages in the stables and an extensive armory, with pieces from the Casa della Contadinanza of Udine; many of its 350 rooms have been furnished with antique furniture and paintings from the Museum of Udine, including the so-called 'Chamber of Napoleon', where the famous emperor slept, who here signed the Treaty of Campoformio in 1797.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kir Florio (21 months ago)
Is a Venetian Villa located in Codroipo. Magnificent and opulent Villa. Woth a visit where they often do internationl exhibitions. In the park in front of the Villa the are help concerts.
Robert Anderson (2 years ago)
It's OK. Most of the house is closed but the outside and gardens/grounds are impressive. Certainly worth a visit considering that entry is free.
Sebastjan Ugrin (2 years ago)
Once a villa to Venetian Doge changed different owners in its past. At some point even Napoleon lived there. A great sight to visit with interesting museumscat its inside (charriots colkection, photographic exposure, ...) offers some good photo opportunities, nearby some excellent restaurants can be found with local foods. Prices-not so cheap.
Krzysztof Nosek (2 years ago)
A magnificent place... in magnificent ruin. Most of the object is under perpetual reparation and closed. No info about it. There’s some staff that knows nothing and provides no info in English, a ticket office that doesn’t sell tickets, and a café without coffee. Strange timeless atmosphere. The park is in particularly disastrous shape with water pools dried out and last year leaves covering disappearing paths. Interesting visit if you are into reflective walks among destruction. But coming here for tourist attraction will be a waste of time.
Dorina Hobbs (2 years ago)
Beautiful Historical Villa. Original family Chapel. A garden to visit and relax. And a restaurant for your needs.
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