Cividale del Friuli Cathedral

Cividale del Friuli, Italy

The Cathedral (Duomo) of Cividale del Friuli was built in the 15th century over a pre-existing construction built in the 8th century. It is a Venetian Gothic building, finished in the 16th century by architect Pietro Lombardo, featuring interventions from the 18th century also. The interior houses an altar dedicated to the Madonna, in the right aisle, and the altarpiece of patriarch Pellegrino II (1195−1204), a silver retable which had been inscribed in Latin by the means of individual letter punches, 250 years before the invention of modern movable type printing by Johannes Gutenberg.

The Christian Museum annexed to the Duomo houses outstanding examples of Lombard sculpture. It contains some interesting relics of the art of the 8th century. The cathedral contains an octagonal marble canopy with sculptures in relief, with a font below it belonging to the 8th century, but altered later. The high altar has a fine silver altar front of 1185. The museum contains various Roman and Lombard antiquities, and works of art in gold, silver and ivory formerly belonging to the cathedral chapter.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ARIFUL SHIHAB (18 months ago)
Nice place in small town Cividale del Friuli near Udine
Rosangela Spera (19 months ago)
e consiglio anche il museo diocesano, a fianco del Duomo. Bellissima e presentata in modo particolare l'ara di Rachis
Stee_f (2 years ago)
Duomo di S. Maria Assunta. Si trova in centro, all'interno possiamo vedere il monumento al patriarca Nicolò Donato, sala del tesoro, vasca battesimale XVII secolo e vari affreschi. Ingresso libero e ampio parcheggio a pagamento.
Giancarlo Ceotto (3 years ago)
Storico e imponente.
Elisa Rucli (3 years ago)
Ingresso gratuito, alto valore storico ed architettonico. Al suo interno opere di valore.
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