Cividale del Friuli Cathedral

Cividale del Friuli, Italy

The Cathedral (Duomo) of Cividale del Friuli was built in the 15th century over a pre-existing construction built in the 8th century. It is a Venetian Gothic building, finished in the 16th century by architect Pietro Lombardo, featuring interventions from the 18th century also. The interior houses an altar dedicated to the Madonna, in the right aisle, and the altarpiece of patriarch Pellegrino II (1195−1204), a silver retable which had been inscribed in Latin by the means of individual letter punches, 250 years before the invention of modern movable type printing by Johannes Gutenberg.

The Christian Museum annexed to the Duomo houses outstanding examples of Lombard sculpture. It contains some interesting relics of the art of the 8th century. The cathedral contains an octagonal marble canopy with sculptures in relief, with a font below it belonging to the 8th century, but altered later. The high altar has a fine silver altar front of 1185. The museum contains various Roman and Lombard antiquities, and works of art in gold, silver and ivory formerly belonging to the cathedral chapter.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

marcus wohlrab (Marcus travels) (15 months ago)
Lovely cathedral and I noticed the song book had lots of hymns in different languages including Arabic which was impressive. There was a baptism today which was lovely and the child was as good as gold!
Salmo Bit (2 years ago)
Begun to build in 1457 it was consecrated in 1529 even if already in the eighth century a church stood here, probably definitively destroyed by the earthquakes of 1348-1364. In June 1909, Pope Pius X elevated it to the rank of minor basilica
Bogdan Tasnadi (2 years ago)
Nice little church in the city centre of Cividale.
Stefano Burello (3 years ago)
To visit ?????the architectural part is remarkable.
Carlo Monai (3 years ago)
Mystical place for its sober grandeur
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