National Archaeological Museum

Cividale del Friuli, Italy

National Archaeological Museum of Cividale del Friuli is known for the high medieval archaeology, particularly with regard to the art Lombard. It is housed in the Palace Pretorio.

It was founded at the Palais de Nordis in 1817 by count Michele della Torre Valsassina, before being transferred in 1990 at the Palace Pretorio in Duomo square. The present palace is attributed to Andrea Palladio and was built between 1565 and 1586.

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Founded: 1565
Category: Museums in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lello Gnesutta (3 years ago)
Il museo è dedicato alla Cividale romana e longobarda. Il percorso è chiaro, disposto e illuminato al meglio. La storia longobarda dell'area è testimoniata dai corredi funerari di uomini (spade, fibule e croci sbalzate in oro) e donne (pettini e gioielli). Vale la visita anche per il contesto della piccola cittadina che lo ospita.
Alex Gasp (4 years ago)
Very interesting museum. Cividale has a lot of stories to tell. The museum is focused in particular on the Longobardi Kingdom that had in Cividale a very important place. Every first weekend of the month you can access the museum for free and there are also events of every kind (music, conferences and so on). The location is wonderful in the main center of the town. Free parking on the other side of the Natisone river .... just cross the Devil's bridge!
Matt Bunker (5 years ago)
A fantastic collection of very important early mediaeval finds from the Langobard period. Well worth travelling to pay a visit.
Michelle Lynch (5 years ago)
Interesting.
Michał Pajor (5 years ago)
Very nice place, a lot of things to see. Unfortunately not all descriptions are in English.
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