Chapel of St. Mary and St. Nathalan

Stonehaven, United Kingdom

The Chapel of St. Mary and St. Nathalan is a ruined chapel overlooking the North Sea immediately north of Stonehaven. The founding of this Christian place of worship is associated with St. Nathalan, who lived circa 650 AD. It was dedicated in 1276 by William Wishart, Bishop of St Andrews, and probably stands on the same site as St Nathalan’s early church. The chapel was never a parish church but was included within the parish of Fetteresso. Several Scottish monarchs, in particular James IV, frequently worshipped here and gave generous donations to the chapel.

The chapel is at the point where the Highland Boundary Fault meets the sea and so is on the dividing line between the highlands and lowlands of Scotland. The Chapel of St. Mary and St. Nathalan is one of the oldest surviving structures in Kincardineshire.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1276
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elina Skudra (18 months ago)
Beautiful chapel ruins, beautiful views.
chh (19 months ago)
Fascinating historic church situated in a beautiful clifftop location.
Jakub Olszewski (2 years ago)
Cool
Murray (2 years ago)
Worth a visit
Philip Walker (2 years ago)
A very interesting ruin with a lot of history over many years.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Bamberg Historic City Centre

Bamberg is located in Upper Franconia on the river Regnitz close to its confluence with the river Main. Its historic city center is a listed UNESCO world heritage site.

Bamberg is a good example of a central European town with a basically early medieval plan and many surviving ecclesiastical and secular buildings of the medieval period. When Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, became King of Germany in 1007 he made Bamberg the seat of a bishopric, intended to become a 'second Rome'. Of particular interest is the way in which the present town illustrates the link between agriculture (market gardens and vineyards) and the urban distribution centre.

From the 10th century onwards, Bamberg became an important link with the Slav peoples, especially those of Poland and Pomerania. During its period of greatest prosperity, from the 12th century onwards, the architecture of this town strongly influenced northern Germany and Hungary. In the late 18th century Bamberg was the centre of the Enlightenment in southern Germany, with eminent philosophers and writers such as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and E.T.A. Hoffmann living there.

Bamberg extends over seven hills, each crowned by a beautiful church. This has led to Bamberg being called the 'Franconian Rome'.