Chapel of St. Mary and St. Nathalan

Stonehaven, United Kingdom

The Chapel of St. Mary and St. Nathalan is a ruined chapel overlooking the North Sea immediately north of Stonehaven. The founding of this Christian place of worship is associated with St. Nathalan, who lived circa 650 AD. It was dedicated in 1276 by William Wishart, Bishop of St Andrews, and probably stands on the same site as St Nathalan’s early church. The chapel was never a parish church but was included within the parish of Fetteresso. Several Scottish monarchs, in particular James IV, frequently worshipped here and gave generous donations to the chapel.

The chapel is at the point where the Highland Boundary Fault meets the sea and so is on the dividing line between the highlands and lowlands of Scotland. The Chapel of St. Mary and St. Nathalan is one of the oldest surviving structures in Kincardineshire.

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Founded: 1276
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Neil Robertson (4 years ago)
The chapel is a ruin so graveyard only. Great sea and golf views.
danny B (4 years ago)
Plan the trip with the weather and you'll experience a lovely day out.
Corrie Ling (5 years ago)
Interesting place notices were helpful and informative atmospheric
alan walker (5 years ago)
Good views over the coast, stonehaven and the golf course best on a good weather day.
Paula Birks (5 years ago)
Breath taking views and a fascinating historical site.
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