The medieval stone church of Ås date back to the 12th century. It is the only church in Öland where the tower is located in the east side. The church was enlarged in 1770 and the interior is mainly from the 18th-19th centuries. The pulpit is very unusual; this nineteenth century work is directly above the altar, an arrangement rarely seen in Swedish churches. The church is long established as a landmark for seafarers. During the nineteenth century the tower was rebuilt to incorporate a lantern, so that it doubled as an early lighthouse.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hannu Kiuttu (3 months ago)
Denna camping har trevlig ägare samt personal som vill att vi skall trivas. Här är rent o fräscht och ordning o reda. Ägaren Jonas ställer alltid upp oavsett dag o tid. För natur- o kulturintresserade är läget fantastiskt.
Ville Ällä (7 months ago)
The opening times of the reception are more than a bit eccentric (8-10 and then from 17 to God knows when), but you can put your tent in the shadow and the facilities are pretty good. Although I didn't test it, they have a pool to make up for the lack of a beach. I suspect the rooms are cheap enough, although I'd already put up my tent so I had to take a tent place when the reception finally opened.
Vreten H (2 years ago)
Felt very much like a camp from the 80s. Positive were clean toilets. Room somewhat dusty. Breakfast was very uninspiring, not to say quite bad. Not worth the money. Don't buy it, make your own! If it wasn't for the breakfast I would give three stars considering the relative cheap price.
Amir Benyovitch (4 years ago)
Cheap and clean. The rooms are quite small but good enough. Located in a very good place for hiking and there is also a pool. The breakfast was very basic.
Pierre Lindau (4 years ago)
Cheap and good and very near to the southest beacon on the island Öland.
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