Esphigmenou Monastery

Mount Athos, Greece

The Esphigmenou Monastery is located on the northeastern coast of the Athos Peninsula close to the Monastery of Chilandari. It is ranked eighteenth in the hierarchical order of the twenty monasteries located on the peninsula.

Esphigmenou monastery has existed since the 10th century, although Athonite tradition attributes its founding to Empress Pulcheria, the sister of Emperor Theodosius II, in the 5th century. The origin of the name for the monastery is uncertain. The name of the monastery came from a founding monk who wore a tight belt or from the name of the site upon which the monastery was built. The monastery is built near the sea as at the time it was built the sea was safe from foreign attackers. Manuscripts, however, record serious raids in 1047 and 1534. The 1534 raid was the most severe and was preceded by a fire in 1491.

In between the raids and fire Esphigmenou was favored by the emperors in Constantinople as imperial chrysobulls record the acquisition of property for Esphigmenou in Prolakas, Sloutarass, Krosouvo, Vrasta, Thessaloniki, and Constantinople. Also, Esphigmenou is noted as being the home, in 1310, of St. Athanasius who was Patriarch of Constantinople and of Gregory Palamas, in 1335, who was Archbishop of Thessalonki.

In the 17th century, Esphigmenou entered into a period of decline due to serious financial difficulties. The monastery began a recovery during the following century. This recovery was aided by Grigorios, Metropolitan of Melenikion who made payment of the monastery's debts his main project.

In early part of the 19th century, Theodoritos of Lavra, as the abbot of Esphigmenou, reorganized the monastery as a coenobium and began the construction of a new katholikon in 1806 on the site of an earlier church built in 1010. He built other new buildings such as a new refectory as well. Between 1821 and 1832 Esphigmenou ceased to exist as a monastery as the Ottoman Turkish army commandeered and used the monastery buildings as barracks during the Greek war for independence. With the departure of the Turkish forces, the monastery was restored by Agathangelos Ayiannanitis. The rebuilding effort continued until 1870 and resulted in the construction of the monastery's modern buildings. These included the addition of a exonarthex on the katholikon, construction of the bell tower and a number of chapels and the southern gateway.

The katholikon is dedicated to the Ascension of Our Lord. There are two chapels in the katholikon and seven outside of it.

The monastery library contains 372 manuscripts and over 8,000 printed books. Among the treasures held by the monastery, Esphigmenou's most treasured possession is the icon of Our Lady Eleousa. In addition to relics of saints, the monastery possesses the so-called cross of Pulcheria and a large part of the tent used by Napoleon. The tent remnant is used as the curtain for the sanctuary door in the katholikon on the feast day of the Holy Ascension.

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Mount Athos, Greece
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Founded: 10th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nick Van Konst (4 months ago)
The last Castle of Hellenism and the Orthodox ideas, with megatons of knowllege inside.
Novak Delija (2 years ago)
I visited this monastery a few years ago with my father. We travelled from Serbia and visited 3 monasteries on Mt Athos.. Hilandar, Esfigmenou and Vatopedi. We made arrangements with Hilandar and Vatopedi for the diamonitrion (pilgrim visa) which allows you to stay max 3 nights on the island, but were unable to contact the brethren of Esfigmenou to make arrangements with them. We prayed and left it in God's hands. When we arrived at the monastery unannounced we were greeted by an older monk sitting next to the front gate with a smile on his face and he said to us that we were more than welcome to stay the night. The experience at Esfigmenou was amazing. The monks were very warm and welcoming. They even had a few monks from Serbia. They are very religious but you can see they are financially not in a great position. Vatopedi for example has an elevator to take you to a different floor while Esfigmenou doesn't have electricity. This didn't stop us from enjoying ourselves in prayer and conversation. The monks of Esfigmenou have a special and deep devotion to defending the Orthodox Christian faith. They are sometimes critical of certain people who act against the orthodox faith such as the ecumenical patriarch who is a proponent of the heresy of ecumenism (uniting the orthodox faith with the papists). These monks remind me of Saint Mark of Ephesus the defender of Orthodoxy, who was the only bishop not willing to sign a union with the papists when other orthodox bishops were willing to do so. May God grant them peace, good health, love and resilience. IC XC NIKA
Антонио Бакалски (2 years ago)
Orthodox!
djapeyu pedja (3 years ago)
Esphigmenou Monastery (Gr. Μονη Εσφιγμενου) - the monastery on Mount Athos, which is in the hierarchy of Mt. Athos monastery in the 18th place. Located in the eastern part of the peninsula Atonskog. Founded in X - XI century. Cathedral of the (beginning of XIX century) is dedicated to the Ascension of the Lord. Anthony of Kiev became a monk here. From 1821 to 1832, did not exist as a monastery, because the Ottoman authorities occupied the monastery buildings and used them for their own purposes during the Greek uprising for independence. In 1974 the brotherhood of the monastery refused to mention the name of the patriarch of Constantinople, accusing him of ecumenism, primarily due to meeting with the Pope. 2005 was established canonically recognized communities of the monastery, which has the right to possession of the monastery. The library of the monastery contains 372 original manuscripts (75 in parchment) and 8,000 printed books. Monastery since 1988, along with other nineteen svetogorskih monastery, is on UNESCO's World Heritage List as part of the monuments of the Middle Ages unified under a protected whole Mount Athos.
Maniaouri (3 years ago)
The power of God has given to the monks the strength and courage for resisting the dark forces of the NWO who are trying to eliminate them. They are saying ''NO'' to the evil plans of the NWO. This is why your support is of utmost importance for protecting the courageous monks and the beautiful Esfigmenou monastery with its long historical and religious values.
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