Château de Luc

Luc, France

The Château de Luc was built in the 12th century on a previous Celtic site. The castle, as a strategic point between the two provinces of Gévaudan and Vivarais, guarded a link to the south of France of the Auvergne frequently used by pilgrims of Saint Gilles, also known as the Regordane Way, on which it was a toll-gate.

For the first 100 years or so of its existence it was the home of the Luc family. In the 13th century it became the property of other regional seigneurs. During the Hundred Years' War it withstood a number of sieges. During the 16th century Wars of Religion the state of Gévaudan garrisoned the castle. Around 1630 the castle was dismantled under orders of Richelieu. During the period surrounding the French Revolution it continued to fall apart from neglect.

It remains in ruins today and attracts hikers who re-trace Stevenson's route on the GR 70.

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Address

Luc Village, Luc, France
See all sites in Luc

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alexis Sciaux (9 months ago)
Sympa mais les pancartes pourraient être mieux rédigées pour être plus explicite
Marie-Françoise BARTHELEMY (10 months ago)
Luc... lieu magique. Le château est somptueux, du moins ce qu'il en reste ! Paysage époustouflant.... Que c'est beau la Loźère
Jean Luc Burtet (15 months ago)
Très belle ruine, vue magnifique, nous sommes montés à pied, mais l'on peut y accéder en voiture.
L'or F (16 months ago)
Belles ruines. Beau point de vue depuis la tour. Accès facile. Parking et visite Gratuite. A voir .
Sam Morton (17 months ago)
A hidden gem. Fine food and a sommelier for an owner
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