The The Chateau at Klášterec nad Ohří is a prominent landmark in the town's recently restored historic urban conservation area. The chateau is set in an extensive landscape park, with 220 tree species, some rare from around the world. The park features a Baroque style sala terrena pavilion, with a gloriette mezzanine decorated with architectural sculptures by Jan Brokoff (1680s).

The park's northern section has an installation of the Stations of the Cross (1690s) and the Church of the Holy Trinity with the Crypt of the Thun Noble Family.

The Chateau at Klášterec nad Ohří exhibits an extensive porcelain collection from the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague. Occupying 21 rooms on the chateau’s first floor, the collection of Bohemian and Czech porcelain documents the more than 200-year-old history of porcelain manufacturing in Bohemia. The historical showcases and interiors feature the output of porcelain factories in Slavkov, Klášterec nad Ohří, Březová, Kisibl, Chodov, Stará Role, Dalovice, Prague, Loket, Budov and Ždanov.

The display presents a selection of early porcelain produced in China and Japan, as well as Meissen, Vienna and Nymphenburg between the 17th and 19th centuries.

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Founded: 1514
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Radek Chamula (18 months ago)
Super park
Lucie Rezacova (2 years ago)
Perfect place for family trip
Sir Rekt CZ (2 years ago)
Nice garden, ugly castle
Nepal News (2 years ago)
great historcal place near beutifiul park. great place to hangout.
Mikhail Osikov (3 years ago)
Anything interesting
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