Roudnice Castle was built in the 12th century by Bishop Jindřich Břetislav, the nephew of the Czech king Vladislav I, to protected an important trade route from Prague to Upper Lusatia along the Elbe. The castle complex included several farm buildings, protected by a fortified wall; the castle itself had walls that were two meters thick, and watch towers in each corner. In the mid-14th century, it was rebuilt in a Gothic style and became a favorite summer residence for Prague bishops. It is said that Jan Hus was ordained as a priest there.

In 1421, the Catholic Church sold the castle to Jan Smiřický, who renovated it once again. George of Poděbrady, king of Bohemia (1420-1477), captured Roudnice from Smiřický in 1467. It passed into the ownership of William Rožumberk, the Supreme Burgrave and one of the wealthiest men in Bohemia. After Rožumberk’s death, his widow Polyxena Pernštejn married Zdenek Vojtěch of Lobkowicz, Chancellor of the Czech Kingdom and later 1st Prince Lobkowicz, bringing Roudnice into the Lobkowicz family’s possessions. In 1652 their son Václav Eusebius, 2nd Prince Lobkowicz, embarked upon an ambitious project to transform the castle into an early baroque palace. From 1657 until the Second World War the Lobkowicz Collection's library was stored in Roudnice Castle, leading to the library being named the Roudnice Lobkowicz Library.

The castle is open to the public. The basic tour includes visits to the courtyard , tour of the castle chapel with předsálím with information about the family Lobkowicz, a tour of the Romanesque castle from the courtyard, the view from the balcony of the castle. The wine tasting tour includes a tour of the foundations of the original Romanesque castle from the 12th century with a presentation of the town, the castle and the winery.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

More Information

www.lobkowicz.com

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Božena Kulhanková (3 months ago)
Výborná cukrárna,klidné a krásné město,rozhledna a spousta dalších míst
Macken D (3 months ago)
Chudší expozici trochu dorovna ochutnavka místního vína:-)
Eugene A. (3 months ago)
Несколько запущенный, но от этого не менее впечатляющий замок! Был построен и служил, как главный замок семьи Лобковичей. Считается четвёртым из самых крупных замков Чехии! Внутри проводятся регулярные экскурсии, даже в зимнее время. Кроме замка очень красив и интересен и сам городок — Руднице над Лабем, где проживает 13 тысяч человек. Интересно посмотреть монастырь 1333 года постройки, башня глашатаев, средневековый рудный источник, от которого произошло название городка, и множество обычных жилых и торговых зданий, не уступающие красотой главным строениям! Рядом протекает река Лаба, и если её перейти по величественному мосту — откроется обширная панорама на замок, монастырь и несколько городских башен.
Vaclav Sluka (4 months ago)
Kvalita za rozumnou cenu. Zajímavý rustikální interiér.
Magnus Ohman (13 months ago)
Impressive castle, but the exterior in pretty bad shape
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