Berleburg castle is one of the few noble residences in Germany, which has been inhabited by the same family for the last 750 years. The castle was built in the 13th century. The two-storey north wing was expanded in 1555-1557 and the gatehouse dates from 1585. During the reign of Count Casimir, the three-storey central wing was built from 1731 to 1733. the Corps de Logis (the principal block of palace) was built in 1732-1739. 

A guided tour provides amongst others an insight few into the ballrooms, the great hall, the chapel, and some of the private chambers of the family of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg. The journey takes you to the corps de Logis, completed in the year 1733 and further into the social rooms up to the oldest part of the castle. There, you can learn about the long family history and feel the solidarity of the region and the commitment for the county and its people. A return is worth it, because there is always something new to be seen.

The ambiance of the castle also offers a stylish venue for concerts, organized by the Berleburg cultural community. Impressive is the advent and Christmas season, particularly the Christmas tree tour in the castle.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.blb-tourismus.de

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Checker (16 months ago)
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Arlette Janssens Ferber (3 years ago)
We intended to visit the Xmas market and ended up doing a guided tour of the castle as well. It was very interesting. Also good to do it with children.
Bart Hendrix (3 years ago)
The park was extremely well maintained, and the castle looked awesome. I'm deducting one point because the restaurant and bar (if there even was one) was very uninviting l, no lights, no entrance sign, nothing to give us a feeling of curiosity....
B H (3 years ago)
The park was extremely well maintained, and the castle looked awesome. I'm deducting one point because the restaurant and bar (if there even was one) was very uninviting l, no lights, no entrance sign, nothing to give us a feeling of curiosity....
Abigail C (4 years ago)
The tour guide (there are only guided tours whose time you should know prior to going) we had was entertaining and spoke clearly. The castle is also a good size, not too big and not too glitzy to get bored. I enjoyed this place very much. One can also have a meal, coffee or ice cream in a nice restaurant attached to the side of the building.
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