In the year 1196, the Archbishop of Cologne summoned monks from the Cistercian Abbey in Hardhausen to establish a new abbey in a former Premonstratensian convent nearby that had been founded in 1170 but disbanded shortly thereafter. As abbey and landholder, the “Zisterze Breidelare“ would go on to spur the economic, intellectual and spiritual growth of the northeast Sauerland region.

The Bredelar Abbey thrived for a good 600 years. In the 13th century its distinguished scriptorium produced the three-volume, richly illuminated Bredelar Bible, which is today kept in the Hessian State and University Library in Darmstadt. Other manuscripts from the abbey's library are preserved today in Wiesbaden, Berlin, Boston, Liverpool, Manchester, Oxford, Paris and Washington. The remaining building fabric of the abbey is based on a construction plan from 1726.

In 1804 the abbey was disbanded in the course of secularisation. From 1828 to 1932, the monastery was home to an ironworks and foundry called “Theodorshütte”. Theodorshütte was initially set up as both smeltery and foundry of iron, with the first of its three blast furnaces erected in the former abbey church. From 1876 the iron foundry formed the centre of operations, producing extremely large machine parts, building components, iron window frames and stoves. In the latter half of the 20th century, the building progressively deteriorated and fell into disrepair. In 2000, the friends' society Kloster Bredelar e.V. was founded with the aim of restoring the complex for use as a community and cultural centre.

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Details

Founded: 1196
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zaki Al-Maboren (2 years ago)
Location with aura, well suited for art and culture. The people serving the culture are very well suited for it. A visit must be
BFK Jr. (2 years ago)
Very nice historical building with history. Always worth a visit.
Bertold Kleff (2 years ago)
Sehr schönes historisches Gebäude mit Geschichte. Immer einen Besuch wert.
Evi Doenicke (3 years ago)
Waren hier zum Gregorian Voices Konzert. Wunderbar. Das Kloster selbst haben wir noch nicht näher angeschaut. Ist gut zu erreichen und es gibt genügend Parkmöglichkeiten
Ralf Petri (3 years ago)
It's old, but it's not a 'real' tourist attraction. It has a little museum, though. The real strength of this place: It's a very nice location for celebrations.
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