Krickenbeck Castle

Nettetal, Germany

Krickenbeck moated castle is one of the oldest on the lower Rhine. Its history dates back to the year 1104, when the castle was first mentioned. It is unclear why the old castle, which was certainly inhabited by Count Reginar, was abandoned or destroyed. In the mid-13th century the castle was moved to the current location. At the end of the 14th century the new castle belonged to the Counts of Kleve.

Johann Friedrich II of Schesaberg converted the castle into a Baroque mansion between 1708-1721. On September 7, 1902, a fire destroyed the entire mansion. From 1903 to 1904, a three-winged castle was built in the Neo-Renaissance style. Today Krickenbeck is a conference center.

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Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Keerthan Shetty (8 months ago)
Best experience for a lifetime.
JKS (8 months ago)
Very beautiful location and very friendly staff. Unfortunately my room was not very clean (hairs in bathroom and dirt on the floors) and they had no vegan food in the beginning even though requested beforehand.
Tarara Veronica (8 months ago)
Very exquisite place. Happy that I've managed to see. High class services for Germany and excellent value for money .
Rahul Bedi (9 months ago)
Great ambience and location but as a hotel, it's average. They were fully packed for all the 3 days we were there. Take some mosquito repellent.
Carlos Celi (11 months ago)
Amazing place if you need focused time for your corporate retreat or design workshop
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